Covington History Generations Report

  Descendents       RICHARD COVINGTON. Ref:15167. Born: 1825- 1826 at North Carolina NC  Compiled 20/06/2019

  GENERATION   One

   RICHARD COVINGTON. Ref: 15167. Born: 1825- 1826 at North Carolina NC. Father: not known, Father Ref: 0. Mother: not known, Mother Ref: 0.   Mar: 22

   Nov 1858 at Spartanburg Co SC to Clark, Mary Susannah 15168.

      ANNA L. Ref: 21701. Born 22 Aug 1860 at Rutherford NC. Mother: Clark, Mary Susannah, Ref: 15168

      VIOLA. Ref: 21703. Born 16 Dec 1862 at Georgia GA. Mother: Clark, Mary Susannah, Ref: 15168

      OLIVER. Ref: 21704. Born 2 Jan 1864 at Alabama AL. Mother: Clark, Mary Susannah, Ref: 15168

      GEORGE. Ref: 21705. Born 5 Nov 1868 at Alabama AL. Mother: Clark, Mary Susannah, Ref: 15168

      TETIE. Ref: 21702. Born 25 Jan 1870 at Morgan Co AL. Mother: Clark, Mary Susannah, Ref: 15168

      JOHN RICHARD. Ref: 12112. Born 17 Dec 1871 at Morgan Co AL. Mother: Clark, Mary Susannah, Ref: 15168

  GENERATION   Two

   ANNA L COVINGTON. Ref: 21701. Born: 22 Aug 1860 at Rutherford NC. Father: Richard, Father Ref: 15167. Mother: Clark, Mary Susannah, Mother Ref:

   15168.  Died: 8 Sep 1889 at Summit AL aged 29.  Mar: 17 Jul 1881 at Cullman AL to Brittain, Joseph Clairbrn .

   VIOLA COVINGTON. Ref: 21703. Born: 16 Dec 1862 at Georgia GA. Father: Richard, Father Ref: 15167. Mother: Clark, Mary Susannah, Mother Ref: 15168.

    Died: 8 Sep 1874 at Alabama AL aged 11.

   OLIVER COVINGTON. Ref: 21704. Born: 2 Jan 1864 at Alabama AL. Father: Richard, Father Ref: 15167. Mother: Clark, Mary Susannah, Mother Ref: 15168.

    Died: 15 Jan 1869 at Alabama AL aged 5.

   GEORGE COVINGTON. Ref: 21705. Born: 5 Nov 1868 at Alabama AL. Father: Richard, Father Ref: 15167. Mother: Clark, Mary Susannah, Mother Ref:

   15168.  Died: 18 Jan 1869 at Alabama AL aged 0.

   TETIE COVINGTON. Ref: 21702. Born: 25 Jan 1870 at Morgan Co AL. Father: Richard, Father Ref: 15167. Mother: Clark, Mary Susannah, Mother Ref:

   15168.  Died: 6 Feb 1916 at Summit AL aged 46.  Mar: 13 Mar 1890 at Blount Co AL to Brittain, Joseph Clairbrn . Married Joseph Clairborne Brittain, widow

   of her sister Anna L (ref 21702).


   JOHN RICHARD COVINGTON. Ref: 12112. Born: 17 Dec 1871 at Morgan Co AL. Father: Richard, Father Ref: 15167. Mother: Clark, Mary Susannah, Mother

    Ref: 15168.  Died: 17 Apr 1955 at Birmingham AL aged 83.  Mar: 8 Dec 1894 at Blount Co AL to Howell, Hattie Rebecca 12114.

      INA. Ref: 12116. Born 13 Sep 1895 at Blount Co AL. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca, Ref: 12114

      MATTHEW LEE. Ref: 12117. Born 23 Nov 1896 at Blount Co AL. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca, Ref: 12114

      MARY. Ref: 12118. Born 13 May 1898 at Blount Co AL. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca, Ref: 12114

      VICTOR EMMANUEL. Ref: 7524. Born 22 Aug 1900 at Blount Co AL. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca, Ref: 12114

      WILLIAM CLARENCE. Ref: 12119. Born 13 Sep 1902 at Blount Co AL. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca, Ref: 12114

      CHARLES RICHARD. Ref: 12120. Born 29 Aug 1904 at Blount Co AL. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca, Ref: 12114

      JAMES EDWARD. Ref: 12121. Born 11 Sep 1906 at Blount Co AL. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca, Ref: 12114

      HOWARD TAFT. Ref: 12122. Born 19 Apr 1909 at Blount Co AL. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca, Ref: 12114

      SAM SCOTT. Ref: 12123. Born 12 Jan 1912 at Blount Co AL. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca, Ref: 12114

      FLORENCE GENEVA. Ref: 12124. Born 5 Oct 1915 at Blount Co AL. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca, Ref: 12114

      FRED DAINWOOD. Ref: 12125. Born 9 Oct 1917 at Blount Co AL. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca, Ref: 12114

      HATTIE JANE. Ref: 12126. Born around 1919 at Blount Co AL. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca, Ref: 12114

  GENERATION   Three

   INA COVINGTON. Ref: 12116. Born: 13 Sep 1895 at Blount Co AL. Father: John Richard, Father Ref: 12112. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca, Mother Ref:

   12114.  Died: 3 Nov 1973 at Birmingham AL aged 78.  Mar: 22 Feb 1920 at Birmingham AL to Carpenter, Frank Bullock . Had 2 sons: Jack & Frank

   MATTHEW LEE COVINGTON. Ref: 12117. Born: 23 Nov 1896 at Blount Co AL. Father: John Richard, Father Ref: 12112. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca,

   Mother Ref: 12114.  Died: 26 Sep 1985 at Birmingham AL aged 88.  Mar: 16 May 1926 at Alabama AL to Clancey, Texas 12132. Known as "Brother"

   MARY COVINGTON. Ref: 12118. Born: 13 May 1898 at Blount Co AL. Father: John Richard, Father Ref: 12112. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca, Mother Ref:

   12114.  Died: 20 Mar 1971 at Tuscaloosa AL aged 72.  Mar: 28 Apr 1917 at Alabama AL to Blanton, Fred .

   VICTOR EMMANUEL COVINGTON. Ref: 7524. Born: 22 Aug 1900 at Blount Co AL. Father: John Richard, Father Ref: 12112. Mother: Howell, Hattie

   Rebecca, Mother Ref: 12114.  Died: 3 Apr 1969 at Fulton GA aged 68.  Mar: 27 Aug 1929 at Birmingham AL to Frazier, Lillian L 12113.

      VICTOR EMMANUEL. Ref: 12115. Born around 1924 at U.S.A.. Mother: Frazier, Lillian L, Ref: 12113

   WILLIAM CLARENCE COVINGTON. Ref: 12119. Born: 13 Sep 1902 at Blount Co AL. Father: John Richard, Father Ref: 12112. Mother: Howell, Hattie

   Rebecca, Mother Ref: 12114.  Died: 19 Mar 1991 at Birmingham AL aged 88.  Mar: 29 Jan 1926 at Birmingham AL to Norton, Lillian Elizabeth 12131.

   CHARLES RICHARD COVINGTON. Ref: 12120. Born: 29 Aug 1904 at Blount Co AL. Father: John Richard, Father Ref: 12112. Mother: Howell, Hattie

   Rebecca, Mother Ref: 12114.  Died: 3 Oct 1973 at Birmingham AL aged 69.  Mar: 26 May 1925 at Birmingham AL to Woods, Lillian Jerome 12130.

   JAMES EDWARD COVINGTON. Ref: 12121. Born: 11 Sep 1906 at Blount Co AL. Father: John Richard, Father Ref: 12112. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca,

   Mother Ref: 12114.  Died: 22 Sep 1967 at Birmingham AL aged 61.  Mar: 19 May 1928 at Birmingham AL to Harless, Annie V 12129.

   HOWARD TAFT COVINGTON. Ref: 12122. Born: 19 Apr 1909 at Blount Co AL. Father: John Richard, Father Ref: 12112. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca,

   Mother Ref: 12114.  Died: 22 Dec 1998 at Birmingham AL aged 89.

   SAM SCOTT COVINGTON. Ref: 12123. Born: 12 Jan 1912 at Blount Co AL. Father: John Richard, Father Ref: 12112. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca,

   Mother Ref: 12114.  Died: 21 Apr 1988 at Birmingham AL aged 76.  Mar: 24 May 1933 at Birmingham AL to Russell, Ellaree Herndon 12128.

      DENNIS RUSSELL. Ref: 15216. Born 30 Oct 1948 at Birmingham AL. Mother: Russell, Ellaree Herndon, Ref: 12128


   FLORENCE GENEVA COVINGTON. Ref: 12124. Born: 5 Oct 1915 at Blount Co AL. Father: John Richard, Father Ref: 12112. Mother: Howell, Hattie

   Rebecca, Mother Ref: 12114.  Died: 28 Nov 1985 at Alabama AL aged 70.  Mar: 1 Jun 1946 at Alabama AL to Busby, Lewis A . They had 1 son, Johnny

   Busby.

   FRED DAINWOOD COVINGTON. Ref: 12125. Born: 9 Oct 1917 at Blount Co AL. Father: John Richard, Father Ref: 12112. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca,

   Mother Ref: 12114.  Died: 1 Apr 1991 at Birmingham AL aged 73.  Mar: 1 Jun 1946 at South Carolina SC to Clark, Virginia D 12127.

   HATTIE JANE COVINGTON. Ref: 12126. Born: around 1919 at Blount Co AL. Father: John Richard, Father Ref: 12112. Mother: Howell, Hattie Rebecca,

   Mother Ref: 12114.   Mar: around 1941 at U.S.A to Dom, Conway . They had 2 sons

  GENERATION   Four

   VICTOR EMMANUEL COVINGTON. Ref: 12115. Born: around 1924 at U.S.A.. Father: Victor Emmanuel, Father Ref: 7524. Mother: Frazier, Lillian L, Mother

   Ref: 12113.


   DENNIS RUSSELL COVINGTON. Ref: 15216. Born: 30 Oct 1948 at Birmingham AL. Father: Sam Scott, Father Ref: 12123. Mother: Russell, Ellaree

   Herndon, Mother Ref: 12128.   Mar: Dec 1977 at Birmingham to Marsh, Vicki Ann 15345. An American author whose work includes two novels and three

   nonfiction books. His subject matter includes spirituality, the environment, and the South. Covington's book Salvation on Sand Mountain was a 1995 National

   Book Award finalist and his articles have been published in The New York Times, Vogue and Redbook.

  

   Covington was born in Birmingham, Alabama, studied fiction writing and earned a BA degree from the University of Virginia, then served in the U.S. Army. He

   earned an MFA in the early 1970s from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, studying under Raymond Carver. He taught English at the College of Wooster. He

   married his second wife, writer Vicki Covington, in 1977. The couple returned to Birmingham the following year, and he began teaching at the University of

   Alabama at Birmingham. The couple divorced in 2005. They have two daughters and three grandchildren.

   In 1983,

  

   Dennis Covington went to El Salvador as a freelance journalist. In 2003, he became Professor of Creative Writing at Texas Tech University. In 2005, he was a

   judge for the National Book Awards.Covington spoke at a talk hosted by the University of Central Florida's literary magazine The Cypress Dome in 2009.

    

   In November 2017, Covington started his column called “Deep in the Heart,” published online by conservative magazine The American Spectator. He wrote a

   total of 20 mini-essays on life in Texas, family, lost love, health issues, and his childhood in Alabama. Covington’s essays were well-received.

  

   Works include: Lasso the Moon (New York 1991 - Lizard, Delacorte Press), Salvation on Sand Mountain (snake handling and redemption in Southern

   Appalachia) - (Reading, Mass 1995 - Addison Wesley) also Cleaving: the story of a marriage (New York 1999 - North Point Press) co-written with wife Vicki.

   Redneck Riviera: Armadillos, Outlaws, and the Demise of an American Dream, New York: Counterpoint, 2004.

   Revelation: A Search for Faith in a Violent Religious World, New York: Little Brown & Company, 2016.

  

   SYNOPSIS OF "Lizard" PLAY

  

   The story revolves around the life of a thirteen-year-old boy named Lucius Sims from De Ridder, Louisiana. Lucius suffers form several deformities including

   an Illness, which cause his eyes to be more on the sides of his head than normal. He is sent to a state school for retarded boys because his guardian, Miss

   Cooley, does not know how a child with such severe physical disabilities can function in a normal environment. While at the school, he is given the nickname

   "Lizard" due to his awkward appearance.

  

   Lizard escapes the school with a couple of actors who are traveling to Birmingham, Alabama to perform The Tempest. He joins the actors on their journey and

   decides to take the role of Caliban in the production. Through his work on the play, Lizard proves his capacity to learn, understand, perform, and empathize

   with one of Shakespeare's greatest Characters. This type of amazing discovery is indicative of the energetic teenage boy living inside a twisted body.

  

   DIRECTOR'S COMMENTS

  

   Lizard is a very unique play on many levels. The tie to Shakespeare, and particularly the character of Caliban in The Tempest, is Covington's ingenious device

   to show us that being different is literally in the eyes of the beholder. While this is a touching play, it is also a comic throughout and yet it deals with some very

   serious issues such as alcoholism, racism, civil rights, and those magical days of yesteryear-the seventies. It is a must see for audiences young and old.

  

   ABOUT THE PLAYWRIGHT:

  

   Alabama Author Dennis Covington's award -winning young adult novel, LIZARD, was adapted for production at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival as part of

   the Southern Writers' Project in 1994. Last year, the ASF production of LIZARD was selected to perform at the Olympic Arts Festival in Atlanta, Georgia.

   Since that time, Covington won the Barrie Stavis Playwriting Award for Best New Play of the Year (Lizard) at the National Theatre Conference in New York

   City.

  

   His latest book entitled SALVATION ON SAND MOUNTAIN was among the finalists for the prestigious National Book Award for 1995. In addition, Covington

   has published another young adult novel, LASSO THE MOON, which was published in 1995. Currently, he directs the creative writing program at the University

    of Alabama at Birmingham and works as a journalist, writing about the South for the New York Times. Covington is married to novelist Vicki Covington, and

   the two have plans to publish two new works in the near future. The SITP/TWU production of LIZARD will mark the Texas premiere of the play.


  

   INTERVIEW WITH Brett Grainger and Rose Marie Berger

  

   Did you ever get bored in church as a kid? Did you hide comic books or crossword puzzles in your Bible case to combat the boredom of a stale sermon?

   Well, they don’t have that problem at the church Dennis Covington used to go to.

  

   While writing his book Salvation on Sand Mountain (Viking-Penguin, 1996; see review in March-April 1996), Dennis Covington attended a church where

   members of the congregation drink strychnine from mason jars and handle poisonous snakes.

  

   In person, Covington does not come across as the sort of guy who would handle lethal objects by choice. But he’s no stranger to danger. Covington made 12

   trips to El Salvador as a journalist, often working amid intense crossfire during the war. Now back in his hometown of Birmingham, Alabama, the soft-spoken

   college instructor and author is one of the most exciting new voices in Southern writing. His prose is lyrical, compassionate, and full of the musicality that

   defines Southern speech and experience.

  

   Covington is currently busy at work on two new projects. With his wife, Vicki, he is co-writing a book describing their well- drilling trip to Belize this summer.

   Dennis is also working on a new book for Viking-Penguin.

  

   While on tour promoting Salvation on Sand Mountain (which was a finalist for the National Book Award), Covington took time out from his hectic schedule to

   speak with us about writing, faith, and worship after snake-handling. Staff members Brett Grainger and Rose Marie Berger interviewed Covington in the back

   room of a Washington, D.C. bookstore in April. —The Editors

  

   Brett Grainger: You have a wonderful ear for language. While reading Salvation on Sand Mountain, I recited much of it aloud to a friend. I was struck that it

   sounded as if it had been written to be read aloud. Was this intentional on your part? If so, do you think there is any conscious link between this style of writing

   and the content or theme of your story?

  

   Dennis Covington: I think there is. I found myself writing sometimes in the cadences I heard in the snake-handling churches. The preaching is so musical and

   rhythmic and poetic. I think I patterned my own style after that…and after the language of the New Testament.

  

   I was reading the New Testament while I was writing the book—it was the only thing I was reading. I had never read it before. Even though I had been raised in

   the church, I had never just read the New Testament. It was a revelation for me.

  

   Grainger: So you feel that reading the New Testament at the same time influenced the style of the book?

  

   Covington: I think so. Some of the musicality of the text transferred to the book. I can’t read the Bible in other translations [than the King James Version] now.

   I’m aware of the missing element. And, of course, the handlers won’t…nothing else is the Bible.

  

   Grainger: In your book you write, “At the heart of the impulse to tell stories is a mystery so profound that even as I begin to speak of it, the hairs on the back of

   my hand are starting to stand on end.” What, for you, is at the center of this mystery, this deep human impulse to tell stories?

  

   Covington: That is how the gospel came to us—in the form of a story—and I don’t know why. Why did God choose that as the means? Stories make sense of

   our experience, clearly.

  

   In that passage I was talking about the writer’s uncanny ability to see the past, present, and future at the same time. For God that’s no problem; it all is the

   same, you know: The past is here and now, as is the present. Artists simply tap into something of a spiritual nature when we write a story and, unknown to us

   sometimes, we’re also tapping into the past and the future.

  

   Grainger: In the May-June 1996 issue of Sojourners, we focused specifically on the relationship between religious faith and creativity. What is the connection

   for you between your faith and your vocation as a writer?

  

   Covington: I’ve thought a lot about that, but I don’t know whether I can articulate my thoughts. Madeleine L’Engle has a wonderful book called Walking on Water




      ASHLEY JENNINGS. Ref: 15346. Born around 1978 at Alabama AL. Mother: Marsh, Vicki Ann, Ref: 15345

  GENERATION   Five

   ASHLEY JENNINGS COVINGTON. Ref: 15346. Born: around 1978 at Alabama AL. Father: Dennis Russell, Father Ref: 15216. Mother: Marsh, Vicki Ann,

   Mother Ref: 15345.

  GENERATION   Spouses

   Mary Susannah COVINGTON. Ref: 15168. Born: during 1835 at Spartanburg Co SC. Father: Clark, Father Ref: 0. Mother: not known, Mother Ref: 0.  Died:

   during 1887 at Alabama AL aged 52.  Mar: 22 Nov 1858 at Spartanburg Co SC to Richard 15167.

   Hattie Rebecca COVINGTON. Ref: 12114. Born: 1 Nov 1876 at Blount Co AL. Father: Howell, William Cornel, Father Ref: 0. Mother: Lea, Geneva Jane,

   Mother Ref: 0.  Died: 14 Apr 1953 at Birmingham AL aged 76.  Mar: 8 Dec 1894 at Blount Co AL to John Richard 12112.

   Texas COVINGTON. Ref: 12132. Born: around 1896 at U.S.A.. Father: Clancey, Father Ref: 0. Mother: not known, Mother Ref: 0.   Mar: 16 May 1926 at

   Birmingham AL to Matthew Lee 12117.


   Lillian L COVINGTON. Ref: 12113. Born: around 1900 at U.S.A.. Father: Frazier, Father Ref: 0. Mother: not known, Mother Ref: 0.   Mar: 27 Aug 1929 at

   Birmingham AL to Victor Emmanuel 7524.

   Lillian Elizabeth COVINGTON. Ref: 12131. Born: around 1902 at U.S.A.. Father: Norton, Father Ref: 0. Mother: not known, Mother Ref: 0.   Mar: 20 Jan 1926

   at Birmingham AL to William Clarence 12119.

   Lillian Jerome COVINGTON. Ref: 12130. Born: around 1904 at U.S.A.. Father: Woods, Father Ref: 0. Mother: not known, Mother Ref: 0.   Mar: 26 May 1925 at

    Birmingham AL to Charles Richard 12120.

   Annie V COVINGTON. Ref: 12129. Born: around 1906 at U.S.A.. Father: Harless, Father Ref: 0. Mother: not known, Mother Ref: 0.   Mar: 19 May 1928 at

   Birmingham AL to James Edward 12121.

   Ellaree Herndon COVINGTON. Ref: 12128. Born: around 1912 at U.S.A.. Father: Russell, Father Ref: 0. Mother: not known, Mother Ref: 0.   Mar: 24 May 1933

    at Birmingham AL to Sam Scott 12123. See Photo File "Sam Scott 12123 & Elleree Herndon 12128 -  c1970".

   Virginia D COVINGTON. Ref: 12127. Born: around 1917 at U.S.A.. Father: Clark, Father Ref: 0. Mother: not known, Mother Ref: 0.   Mar: 1 Jun 1946 at South

   Carolina SC to Fred Dainwood 12125.


   Vicki Ann COVINGTON. Ref: 15345. Born: 22 Oct 1952 at Birmingham AL. Father: Marsh, Jack, Father Ref: 0. Mother: Katherine, Mother Ref: 0.   Mar: Dec

   1977 at Birmingham AL to Dennis Russell 15216. Vicki Covington - article by Beth Thames, Huntsville, Alabama

   "Birmingham native Vicki Covington (1952- ) is an award-winning novelist, short-story writer, and essayist. Her fiction is characterized by themes of family and

   community and is set in her native South. She has described herself as a life-long observer of people, a trait that has proven essential to her life as a writer;

   her nonfiction is often personal and candid.

  

   Vicki Ann Marsh Covington was born in Birmingham, Jefferson County, on October 22, 1952, to Jack Marsh, a metallurgical engineer, and Katherine Marsh, a

   teacher. She had one sibling, the late Randy Marsh, a playwright and co-founder of the Birmingham Festival Theatre. At her mother's urging, Covington began

   keeping a journal at age eight. Covington observed the people around her and wrote down what they did and said. She states that she enjoyed solitude and

   liked watching life more than participating in it. Though she wrote every day, she would not think of herself as a writer for many decades.

  

   She was educated in the Birmingham public school system and graduated from Woodlawn High School in 1971. Covington attended the University of

   Alabama, where she received a bachelor's degree in sociology in 1974 and a master's degree in social work in 1976. She worked as a social worker in

   Birmingham from March 1976 to August 1977, at which time she moved to Wooster, Ohio, with her fiancé, writer Dennis Covington, whom she had known

   since childhood. She continued her career as a social worker, and Dennis taught English at the College of Wooster. In December 1977, the couple travelled

   back to Birmingham for their wedding and then returned to Wooster. The couple moved back to Birmingham in August 1978, and Dennis taught English at the

   University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and Vicki worked as a social worker and outpatient therapist in the UAB Department of Psychiatry's substance

   abuse program from 1978 to 1988. Throughout this period, Covington continued to write in her journal and began developing her entries into short stories.

  

   She began to send her stories out to journals in Ohio, but none were published until after her move to Alabama. She had some successes with early stories in

   minor literary journals during the early 1980s. Then, in 1986, The New Yorker published two stories, "Duty," in the August 18th issue, and "Magnolia," in the

   March 24th issue. Covington has described these events as turning points in her writing career because they brought her name to a wider audience and

   gained the attention of publishing companies.

  

   At the request of an editor at publishing house Simon & Schuster, Covington developed an unpublished short story into the novel Gathering Home, a coming-

   of-age story that was published in 1988. Covington left her job as a social worker that year after receiving grants from the Alabama State Council on the Arts

   and the National Endowment for the Arts. Her second novel, Bird of Paradise (1990), tells the story of a retired waitress sustained by a network of community

   and friends; it received the 1991 Fiction Award from the Alabama Library Association.

  

   Subsequent novels include Night Ride Home (1992), set in a small Alabama mining community around the time of the December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor,

    and The Last Hotel for Women (1996), set during the civil rights movement and focused on the Freedom Rides, the Ku Klux Klan, and the Birmingham

   Campaign of 1963. Covington and her brother adapted The Last Hotel for Women for the stage, and it was performed in 1996 at Birmingham Festival Theatre

    and again in June 2012.

  

   Covington also has published two books of nonfiction: Cleaving: The Story of a Marriage, co-authored with husband Dennis Covington, which was named a

   Best Book of the Year by The Library Journal in 1999, and Women in a Man's World, Crying in 2002. Cleaving is a collection of essays on struggle, enduring

   love, and forgiveness in a long marriage, and Women in a Man's World is a collection of essays that originally appeared as columns for The Birmingham News

    and for specific literary occasions, such as the Eudora Welty Literary Symposium. The essays are divided into six themes: "Girls and Women,"

   "Neighborhood," "Death," "The South," "Spiritual Matters," and "Writing." The essays address topics such as raising her daughters, coping with her husband's

    cancer, her own heart attack, and her mother's Alzheimer's disease, and offering her own perspectives on family, friendship, and faith.

  

   During 2001 and 2002, Covington wrote a regular column for The Oxford American called "Meditations for Bad Girls." She describes these pieces as both

   spiritual and secular. One is titled "Men I've Kissed" and another, "Women I've Kissed." Her work also has been published in Southern Living, Southern

   Humanities Review, Shenandoah, PMS, and other journals. Citing the negative reaction to the directness and honesty about the Covington's difficult marriage

   as the cause, Covington stopped writing altogether in 2002. She taught fiction writing at UAB from 1998 to 2009, first as an adjunct in the English Department

   and then in the Honors Program, and has also spoken at writing conferences around the region. In 2017, after a 15-year hiatus, Covington published the novel

   Once in a Blue Moon, set in the Glen Iris neighborhood of Birmingham during the presidency of Barack Obama.

  

   Covington's novels are set in Alabama, and her characters are decidedly southern. A January 1, 1996, review in Publisher's Weekly noted that Covington has

   the ability to depict southerners—both men and women—with discerning candor and also with sympathetic understanding."


  

   Review by Laurie Parker of The Last Hotel for Women by Vicki Covington. Simon & Schuster New York 1996, $23. ISBN 0-684-81111-1

  

   "Each time I read a book by Vicki Covington, I think, "Will this be the one that does it? Will this be the book that finally brings this writer the attention she

   deserves?" With her fourth novel, Covington may have written the book that will at last place her on the bestseller lists where she belongs.

  

   Covington is a master of undercurrent, telling one story on the surface while tapping into something deeper and more powerful underneath. In this book,

   Covington has given herself a powerful taskÑdepicting Birmingham, Alabama, in Freedom Summer, just as the whole city was about to blow apart. She

   personalizes the events of that summer by focusing on one family, Pete and Dinah Fraley and their children, Benny and Gracie. While we are allowed inside

   the other characters' thoughts, it is the Fraleys who center the novel, and it is their small hotel to which each of the other characters is drawn like metal shavings

    to a magnet.

  

   Covington has also given herself the daunting challenge of writing about Bull Connor, one of the most infamous racists of the day, in the first person. It is a

   testament to Covington's talent for creating rich, complex, and believable characters that she actually makes Connor, if not admirable, at least understandable.

  

  

   Connor's connection to the Fraleys goes back to Dinah's childhood, when the hotel was a bordello run by Dinah's mother, and Connor was a frequent visitor.

   After Dinah took over and turned the house into a respectable hotel, Connor continued to visit the Fraleys as an old friend of the family, tolerated by Dinah

   because of his connection with her dead mother, who was murdered by the Ku Klux Klan. When the Fraleys take in a freedom rider who was injured in a riot as

    her bus pulled into the Birmingham station, those old ties become frayed to the breaking point.

  

   Benny Fraley's romance with the strange visitor, his young sister's wide-eyed yet wise observation of the whirlwind of people and events around the family, and

    Pete Fraley's guilt and frustration at being a white foreman of Negro ironworkers provide texture and depth to the story. But The Last Hotel for Women is

   ultimately about family strength, which is so powerful it can bolster outsiders as well, and about choices: whether to move ahead, or to cling to a dying past. The

    Fraleys stand together to face a new South, while Connor loses his footing and is eventually overcome by the tide of desegregation and civil rights.

  

   The Last Hotel for Women is a powerful book, and a moving one. Its themes still resonate in our society, just as Covington's characters remain in our heads

   long after the last page is turned."

  

   Other works include:

   Night Ride Home (New York 1992 - Simon & Schuster), Bird of Paradise (New York 1990 - Simon & Schuster)

   also co-wrote Cleaving: the story of a marriage (New York 1999 - North Point Press) with husband Dennis