Covington History
 

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Between 1847 and 1868, Mormon emigrants travelling in more than 350 companies departed from various places and headed for the Salt Lake Valley. More than 60,000 members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints travelled in these companies—some traveling by foot, some in wagons, and some pulling handcarts. A number of Covingtons, who had adopted Mormon beliefs in the UK, emigrated to the U.S.A. during the mid 1800s and joined others heading for Utah.

Information on these Covington Mormon Pioneers are provided later in this document, but first a brief potted history of The Church of Latter Day Saints (LDS) or The Mormons, as they are also widely known

 

Mormonism at a glance

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was founded in 19th century America and has 13.5 million members world-wide (LDS 2008 Statistical Report).

Mormonism has been present in the UK since 1837 and has 190,000 members (LDS 2008 figures).

·         The church is called The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, or The Church of Jesus Christ.

·         Mormons believe their church is a restoration of the Church as conceived by Jesus and that the other Christian churches have gone astray.

·         The church was founded by Joseph Smith (1805 - 1844).

·         It was then developed by Brigham Young who migrated with the new Mormons to Salt Lake City in 1847.

·         Mormons believe that God has a physical body, is married, and can have children.

·         They also believe that humans can become gods in the afterlife.

·         Mormons are strongly focused on traditional family life and values.

·         They oppose abortion, homosexuality, unmarried sexual acts, pornography, gambling, tobacco, consuming alcohol, tea, coffee, and the use of drugs.

·         One of the more common misconceptions is that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints advocates polygamy. However, this was discontinued over a century ago and the Church excommunicates anyone who practices it.

 

 

Joseph Smith's life - "An authentic religious genius"

 

Joseph Smith, founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, has been described by Professor Harold Bloom as "an authentic religious genius."

Joseph Smith

 

He was born into a poor family in 1805 in Sharon, Vermont, USA, the fifth of eleven children. Because the family was so poor, Joseph received very little education - learning only basic maths and literacy. But he did spend much time in Bible study. Later the family moved to Palmyra in New York. It was a time of religious revival and the teenage Joseph was not sure which version of Christianity he should follow. He found a Bible text that told him to ask God what to do.

The Vision

Joseph went out into the country and prayed for guidance, and he had a vision of God the Father and Jesus Christ. Joseph wrote: I saw a pillar of light exactly over my head, above the brightness of the sun, which descended gradually until it fell upon me. Two beings appeared within the light "whose brightness and glory defy all description". One of them spoke his name, pointed to the other, and said,” "This is My Beloved Son.  Christ told Joseph that he should not join any existing church, but should be God's agent to restore the true Church of Christ. This vision, and its effect on Joseph are a close parallel with the vision of Paul on the Damascus Road. Joseph went home and told his family. They supported him, although the local churches, not surprisingly, were highly critical.

The Golden Book

Three years later, Smith was visited by the angel Moroni and told that he should unearth and translate a holy book written on plates of gold, which contained the religious writings of the prophets of ancient America. Smith wanted to take the plates immediately but was advised by Moroni not to do so. Four years later Smith removed the plates, and spent 3 months translating the words engraved on them into the Book of Mormon.

Restoration of the Church

Before Joseph could fulfil the task of restoring the Church it was necessary for him to get the authority to do it. This authority could come only from God. In 1829 Joseph was visited by John the Baptist. The Baptist laid hands on the heads of Smith and his colleague Oliver Cowdery and gave them the authority of the Aaronic Priesthood. Soon afterwards, the Apostles James, Peter, and John appeared to Joseph and Oliver and gave them the authority of the Melchizedek Priesthood.

With this priestly authority, Smith founded the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Fayette, New York State on 6 April 1830. Joseph set about building the restored church, continuing to receive direct guidance from God on how to do it. During the rest of his short life he translated further scriptures, and wrote down further revelations from God, which form a major part of Church doctrine today. He also founded the missionary programme of the Church, built several towns and was a candidate for US President.

In 1836 the first Mormon Temple was dedicated at Kirtland in Ohio. He suffered much persecution, being jailed over thirty times (although never found guilty), as well as being tarred and feathered. The persecution eventually led to his death at the age of 38. Joseph and his brother Hyrum were shot on 27 June 1844 by a mob of 150 men while they were jail in Illinois on charges of riot and treason.

During Joseph's life the Church grew from six to 26,000 members.

Mormon Pioneers

After the murder of Joseph Smith the Mormons realised that they could not stay safely in the heartland of America. Latter-day Saint settlements were being attacked by mobs who burned crops, destroyed homes and threatened the people.

The Mormons were persecuted for several reasons:

·         They didn't keep slaves, which was seen as a threat to the surrounding slave-owning culture at a time when the abolition of slavery was a big issue.

·         Their doctrine of plural marriage was seen as a serious attack on the social and ethical rules of the period.

·         The rapidly growing and tightly-knit Mormon communities had the potential to exercise considerable political power.

·         They were considered outsiders who led a completely different sort of life.


After Smith's death the new Church leader, Brigham Young, decided that their future lay in the American West. He decided that the people would emigrate en masse. It would be a migration like that of the Israelites who had been forced to leave Egypt in search of the Promised Land..And although the Mormons got to their promised land sooner than the Israelites, they encountered great hardship and suffering along the way.

The first year of migration took the 16,000 migrants to Winter Quarters by the Missouri Rivers. The second stage of migration took them to the Rocky Mountains and to the Great Salt Lake Basin, which they reached in 1847.

Salt Lake City

The Great Salt Lake Basin was extremely remote, and at that time was outside the USA. It was 1000 miles from the nearest significant town in the East, and so a very long way from their persecutors. Brigham Young decided that this was the place where the Mormons should create their new land. The area was an inhospitable desert, but the Mormons were inspired by it, and named it Zion. They gave the local river the name Jordan. And they began to build Salt Lake City, which is still the headquarters of the Church.

Utah

The Mormons saw Salt Lake City as their holy city: Brigham Young called it a "Kingdom of Heaven on Earth". But it was a bleak cold kingdom, and the Mormons had to work hard to make it a liveable place. Their first job was to irrigate the land to make it soft enough to plough and grow food. In 1848 their crops were damaged first by drought and then by a plague of crickets. The crickets were eaten by a flock of seagulls. The "miracle of the Seagulls" is commemorated by a monument in Salt Lake City.

They swiftly created a plan for Salt Lake City itself, with a Mormon Temple at its heart. The Temple itself was dedicated in 1893. The Mormons weren't content with just one city and within the lifetime of Brigham Young they founded another 325 towns.

Government

The Mormons mapped out a huge area of the west which they called Deseret (which means "honeybee"), and asked the US government to make it a new state. The government gave them a smaller patch of land called Utah (after the local Ute tribe of Native Americans), as a territory, not a state. The Church leader Brigham Young became Governor.

Persecution and statehood

In 1857 the US President sent troops to Utah to put down what he had been told was a Mormon uprising. After much confusion and preparations for war, a settlement was negotiated and Mormon growth resumed. The Mormon community grew rapidly, not just by having children, but also by the mass immigration of converts from elsewhere in the USA and from abroad. By the time of Brigham Young's death in 1877, there were 140,000 Mormons in Utah, and at one stage more than half of them were immigrants from Britain. But more trouble was to come. The Mormons at that time believed in plural marriage; meaning that a man could have more than one wife. This was regarded as unlawful by USA and legal action was taken to suppress it. The Mormons resisted; many were jailed for polygamy, while others, including church leaders, went underground.

A law of 1887 placed great restrictions on the Church, removing the political rights of anyone who would not renounce polygamy, and destroying the Church as an economic entity. In 1890, after praying for guidance, Church President Woodruff announced an end to plural marriage.

Statehood

The end of polygamy allowed Utah and the Mormons to take their place in the USA mainstream. In 1896 Utah became the 45th state of the USA. The State symbol is the beehive and the state insect is the honeybee. The beehive was chosen by early leaders of The Church as a symbol of their ideal community; one filled with industry and co-operation.

 

Mormonism in the 20th Century

Twentieth Century

At the end of the 19th Century the Church was still grappling with the money problems that had been caused during the fight to retain polygamy. It decided to bring new life to the custom of tithing a proportion of a member's income to the Church. Within a year church income had doubled, and by 1907 the Church was out of debt. Having until recently been reviled by much of the US population, the Church began to work on its image, and by the late 1920s it had become a respected and respectable institution in the eyes of most Americans.

Dispersion and growth

The Church began to grow strongly outside its Utah stronghold; first in California and the West Coast and then in the East and Midwest. In the first half of the century the number of Mormons grew from 268,331 in 1900 to 979,454 in 1948. Some of this growth was due a reform of the missionary system that provided proper training for missionaries before they set out, and ensured that they had the funds to support them during their service.

International

The second half of the 20th Century saw the Church expand massively outside America. In 1950 only 8% of church members lived outside the USA, by 1990 the figure was 35%. Now less than half the membership lives in the USA. 20% of growth is due to children being born into the faith, while 80% is due to new converts. In 1950 the Church had 8 temples, 4 of them in Utah; by August 2005 it had 122 around the world. Church membership passed 11 million in December 2000.

Mormons in the UK

The number of Mormons in the UK has risen from 6,500 in the 1960s to 190,000 members (LDS 2008 figures). Although the first Mormon Temple in Britain (at Newchapel in Surrey, pictured) was not built until 1958, the church has had a foothold in this country almost since it was founded by Joseph Smith in the USA. The third President of the Church, John Taylor, was an English convert.

Beginnings

The Mormons arrived in Britain at the very beginning of the reign of Queen Victoria. The first Mormon missionaries were sent to England in 1837, led by the Apostle Heber C Kimball. They preached in Preston in July, and baptised their first nine converts the same month in the River Ribble. The first convert to be baptised was George D Watt. By the next May they had converted over 1000 people. By 1850, the Church had 30,747 members in England, and only 26,911 in the USA. By 1854 they had 50,000 members.

Emigration

The growth was not destined to continue in England, as the newly converted soon began to emigrate to the USA. The first batch of emigrants set out for the USA in 1840, and organised mass-migration followed. In 1853, for example, there were nearly 3,000 emigrants.

Preston Temple

Preston remained strongly associated with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and in 1998 the second Mormon Temple in Britain was opened there, close to the town of Chorley and the M6 motorway.

Show Map#

Amasa M. Lyman Company (1850)

 

Wagon, Independent Train, headed Eastbound, 17 August 1850 from Sacramento, California, arriving 29 September 1850. Number in company: 20

Thirty-four men travelled in this company from Sacramento, California. They crossed the Sierra Mountains to Carson Valley, then followed the north route taken by many coming in search of gold in California, to Salt Lake City.

Edward Hunter - Jacob Foutz Company (1847)

 

Wagon, Church Train, headed Westbound, 19 June 1847 from Elkhorn River, Nebraska, arriving 1 October 1847. Number in company: 158. Captains Edward Hunter & Jacob Foutz

155 individuals and 59 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post on the Elkhorn River about 27 miles west of Winter Quarters, Nebraska.

Abraham O. Smoot Company (1852)

 

Wagon, Church Train, headed Westbound, 1 June 1852, from Kansas City, Missouri, arriving 3 September 1852. Number in company: 256. Captain Abraham Owen Smoot

About 250 individuals and 33 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from Kansas City, Missouri.

Joseph S. Rawlins Company (1864)

 

Wagon, Church Train, headed Westbound, 15 July 1864, from Wyoming, Nebraska, arriving 19-20 September 1864. Number in company: 435. Captain Joseph Sharp Rawlins

About 400 individuals and about 50 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Wyoming, Nebraska (the west bank of the Missouri River about 40 miles south of Omaha) on July 15, 1864.

Members of the company arrived from 19-20 September 1864. Two births and nineteen deaths occurred during the journey. According to a newspaper article published upon arrival of the company, "the company had a good trip, meeting with no serious accidents, excepting the loss of about 30 oxen by disease on this side of Laramie."

 

Mormon Covingtons who Emigrated to the U.S.

Sorted by year of birth

Elizabeth COVINGTON. Ref: 4216. Born: 29 Oct 1793 at Bedford. Father: Hodges, Richard, Father Ref: 0. Mother: Hill, Elizabeth, Mother Ref: 0. Died: 13 Oct 1881 at Ogden, Weber UT aged 87. Mar: 8 Nov 1812 at Bedford St Paul to Berrill 2505. One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Christened 4th Jan 1794, Buried 15th Oct 1881. Travelled to Utah with family on the Abraham Owen Smoot Company (1852)

BERRILL COVINGTON. Ref: 2505. Born: 6 Jul 1794 at Wellingborough. Father: Simon, Father Ref: 2510. Mother: Brown, Elizabeth, Mother Ref: 4161. Died: 15 Apr 1881 at Gallatin, Davies MO aged 87. Mar: 8 Nov 1812 at Bedford St Paul to Hodges, Elizabeth 4216. One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Christened: 6 Jul 1794 at Bedford. Believed to have also had 3 other daughters who were still born between 1813-1814.

On July 31, 1837, one day after the first Mormon baptisms in England, the original seven missionaries to proselyte in England held a council in Preston. It was decided that Elders Willard Richards and John Goodson should go to Bedford, “There being a good prospect, from the information received, of a Church being built up in that city.” They left on 1 August and arrived at Bedford the following day
.
Work progressed quickly. The first baptisms occurred on 10 August and by December a Bedford Branch had been organized. Berrill Covington, later to play an important role in the beginnings of the Church in Buckinghamshire, was baptized in 1838 by Elder Willard Richards. He was instrumental in the conversion of two of the first nine Buckinghamshire natives and later became a member of the first branch organized on Buckinghamshire soil. (The Genesis of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Buckinghamshire - The first Buckinghamshire Natives to join the church.)

Came West with the Abraham Owen Smoot Company in 1852. ("List of Persons Sent from Great Britain by the Perpetual Emigrating Fund Co., in the Months of January and February 1852, by Franklin D. Richards Agent at Liverpool sailing on The Ellen Maria," Deseret News [Weekly], 21 Aug. 1852)

Found living in Ward 14, Great Salt Lake City, Utah on the 1860 U. S. Census & in 3rd Ward by 1880 Census.

MARY ANN COVINGTON. Ref: 2506. Born: 31 Mar 1815 at Bedford. Father: Berrill, Father Ref: 2505. Mother: Hodges, Elizabeth, Mother Ref: 4216. Died: 5 Oct 1908 at Ogden, Weber UT aged 93. Mar: 17 Dec 1846 at St Louis MO to Stratton, Joseph Albert . 2nd Mar: 5 Aug 1855 at Ogden, Weber UT to West, Chauncey Walker . One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Emigrated to the U.S.A, arriving in New York in 1842, then to St Louis, where she married Joseph Albert Stratton (b 11 Sep 1821, d 28 Oct 1850) and onto Nauvoo IL, where she worked for the Prophet Joseph Smith. She then subsequently travelled to Utah with her husband in the Daniel Spencer/Perrigrine Sessions company.1847 (185 individuals and 75 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post on the Elkhorn River about 27 miles west of Winter Quarters, Nebraska).

At some point, Joseph Stratton left Utah because he is seen crossing the plains again in 1850 with the Wilford Woodruff Company.

By then she had become the 2nd wife of Chancey Walker West. He would go on to marry a further 7 woman, including her sister Sarah Elizabeth (3468), on the same day, another Mary Ann Covington (1819) and & Susan Hannah Covington (1716). In total he sired 35 children.

Buried 7th Oct 1908 at Ogden, Weber, Utah, USA

ROBERT DOCKERY COVINGTON. Ref: 11745. Born: 2 Aug 1815 at Rockingham NC. Father: Thomas B, Father Ref: 11497. Mother: Thomas, Jane, Mother Ref: 11738. Died: 2 Jun 1902 at Washington UT aged 86. Mar: 2 Feb 1839 at Rockingham NC to Thomas, Elizabeth Ann 12065. 2nd Mar: during 1848 at Salt Lake City UT to Allison, Malinda 13533. 3rd Mar: 28 Dec 1856 at Salt Lake City UT to Roberts, Nancy 13538. One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Saturday, June 19, 1847 on the Oregon Trail:

Elkhorn River, Nebraska: - The Jacob Foutz fifty moved out. They were part of the Edward Hunter Company. The Foutz fifty consisted of 59 wagons and 155 people. [Included in the fourth ten led by Daniel M. Thomas were: Albert Washington Collins, Adeline Sarah Collins, Susan Newman Thomas Collins, Elizabeth Lemon Covington, Emily J. Covington, John Thomas Covington, Robert Dockery Covington, Sarah A. Mathews, James Nicholas Mathis, Mary C. Mathis, Martha Noab, John Robertson, Ann Thomas, Ann Thomas, Catherine Thomas, Daniel Monroe Thomas, Henry Thomas, John T. Thomas, Mahala J. Thomas, Phi lemon Thomas, Tennessee Thomas, Calysta W. Warrick, Louisa Warrick, and Thomas Warrick.]

THE ROBERT DOCKERY FAMILY STORY
Robert Dockery Covington was a college graduate, who helped on his father's plantation raising cotton and tobacco. His wife, Elizabeth Ann Thomas was born April 21, 1820 in Marlboro District of South Carolina and on February 2, 1839 she married Robert Dockery Covington. John's parents moved shortly after their wedding to Marlboro County, South Carolina.

The next move came with Robert's parents, Thomas B. Covington, known as "Big Tommie" and Jane Thomas. They settled in Summerville, Noxbee, Mississippi. They Established large plantations and they prospered, because of Jane Thomas's relatives, having settled there since 1834, also the rich soil and plenty of slave labor helped a great deal. This was the place where John Thomas Covington was born on August 4, 1840.

It was three years later, on January 1, 1843 that John's sister Emily June Covington was born. Around this time, Daniel Thomas had brought home a Book of Mormon. And after Robert Dockery Covington and his wife had heard Elder Clapp preach for two weeks, they were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints on February 3, 1843, in Noxbee County, Mississippi by Benjamin Clapp. Although most of Elizabeth's family joined the church, Robert's family thought that he had lost all his reason. Little did Robert's parents, Thomas B. Covington and Jane Thomas, realize that the son whom they had greeted with open arms at his birth, August 2, 1815 in Rockingham, Richmond, North Carolina, would one day be disinherited by themselves. In fact, in Covington books written by non L.D.S. authors, Robert's name isn't listed among the children. Although, his older brother James, who also joined the L.D.S. church and moved to Salt Lake City, Utah. Nancy later returned to Mississippi in a state of disillusionment.

Soon after Robert had joined the Church, he longed to join the Saints in Nauvoo. At this time he was overseer on two plantations. He set his slaves free, which was protested by the slaves because of their deep love for Robert. Now preparations to leave got underway. On February 1, 1845 Sarah Ann Covington was born. John had a new baby sister. John Thomas Covington was not yet 5 years old, and stories have been told that he "baptized" many of his negro playmates in the muddy ponds before his family left for Nauvoo.

Robert Dockery Covington and Elizabeth Ann Thomas Covington received their endowments January 20, 1846 in the Nauvoo temple. Soon John Thomas Covington lost his sister Catharine Covington, born 1846 and died in 1846 in Nauvoo, Illinois. He also was to lose his toddler sister Sarah, born 1845 in Mississippi and died October 16, 1846 in Winter Quarters. John had gone from a life of wealth and plenty, to a life of great needs and want, but these circumstances and happenings were not all that happened to this family.

In 1847, Robert, Elizabeth along with children John and Emily started for Utah in the Edward Hunter Company under the direction of Captain Daniel Thomas. Elizabeth was expecting again and the ordeals the Saints had to suffer had made inroads on her health. It must have been a trying journey for it seemed that the forces of the elements were pitted against them. The dust storms, the hail storms, lack of good water, and wood to burn, with Indians camped on the opposite bank of the Platt River stampeding cattle crossings often to beg or trade for food that was such a scarce commodity. Sometimes they swarmed in their camp like bees and would often help themselves to whatever was handy. Housewives would often be missing their camping and cooking equipment.

One day while the men were fixing broken wagons they stopped near some currant bushes. Robert D. sent his children John and Emily with buckets to gather what they could. They worked hard picking clean the currant bushes as they went. Just as they finished filling their buckets full of currants, an Indian stepped from behind a bush and gave a war hoop. The children dropped their buckets and fled to the camp. When they neared the camp they looked back and saw the Indian with their currants laughing at his huge joke.

On the morning of August 1, 1847 it was quiet, the heat was terrific. The party of immigrants had called a halt. Saints had not found wood to burn for 11 days and the water was unfit to drink. Some of the animals had died by licking alkali off the ground. They also had wagons to fix. Mrs. Sessions, the midwife was called to take care of Elizabeth Covington. Mrs. Sessions had a buggy so she drove back to the second hundred a distance of some 5 miles. She, Mrs. Sessions brought Sister Covington back to her camp and put her to bed with a new son, Robert Laborious Covington. This all took place in Scotts Bluff, Nebraska.

The Saints were halted here for the day and A.O. Smoot called a meeting and pleaded with the Saints to be more united and to trust in the Lord, and to consider these experiences like a school, readying them for leadership positions. The saints had many hardships to bear during their track westward, some times traveling many miles only finding sparse food for their cattle and other animals, Indians often came into camp and would spread blankets on the ground wanting to trade or be fed, the Saints were counseled not to trade with them, but to feed them. Their was much sickness and death among the pioneers. Eliza R. Snow was a great comfort to the sorrowing, on one occasion she remarked, "Death makes occasional inroads among us. Nursing the sick, tending wagons was laborious service. The patient faithfulness with which it was born. To consign loved ones to these desolate graves was enough to try the hearts of the strongest."

On August 5, they camped 8 to 9 miles from Fort Laramie where the food was plentiful and the water was good, they stayed here for 5 days to fix wagons in need of repair, wash clothes, mend them and to bake. While camping here some bears near the camp disturbed their sleep. Two Indian women who were gathering berries nearby saw these bears and they left gatherings for the bears, some of the pioneers in the company witnessed this.

Traveling became very hard and was going very slow due to the rough terrain, there were hills to climb and several wagons broke. In September, the pioneers crossed miles of sand and the winds blew very hard, here they saw fearful storms and sand, rain, and snow. They encountered pioneers going back East to help the remaining Saints travel West. These travelers camped all night with the party and gave them words of encouragement and of telling them about their new homes in the West. Their words were welcomed and there was a feast prepared by the women of the company that night.

The last miles into the valley were hard ones because of the cold and rugged mountains they had to travel. But arrive they did on September 24, 1847. The Robert Dockery Covington family arrived in the valley, the trip had taken it's toll though for Robert's wife was frail, the hardships had all but taken her strength. She hoped to get stronger, but the cold winter winds along with a severe cold only added to her troubles, and on December 7, 1847 she left her devoted family to carry on her good name.

Marian Adair, a good person helped the family out by helping with the new baby, since milk was very scarce she fed the baby buttermilk and clabber.

Robert Dockery Covington next married a widow, Malinda Allison Kelly, so John, Emily, and baby Robert had a new stepmother and stepsister Kate. This family settled in the Big Cottonwood Ward in Salt Lake City. While they were in Big Cottonwood, Robert was able to teach school and was called "Professor Covington". This is also the area that they lived in when the locust infested Salt Lake Valley. Their crops were spared and they shared their food with their starving neighbors.

In the fall of 1849, John Thomas Covington was only 9 years old when his father accepted a call to be a missionary in the Southern States. And on December 28, 1849, a new daughter was born to Malinda and Robert, she was named Mary Ellen Covington.

May Ellen Covington didn't meet her father till she was almost 7 years old and John was almost 16. That was in the spring of 1856, when Robert returned from the Southern States mission.

Robert Dockery Covington took a plural wife on December 28, 1856. Her name was Nancy Roberts. To this union was born three children Pheobe, Thomas, Malinda, when Nancy Roberts died, Robert's second wife Malinda mothered her children as well as those of Robert's first wife Elizabeth.

This Covington family accepted a calling to settle Dixie and moved to Washington, Washington County Utah. John Thomas Covington found himself in new surroundings once again, and on August 1, 1857, the son of the Bishop of Washington Ward. John's next few years were filled with hard work, planting, harvesting of grains, corn, tobacco, and cotton. In 1858, Grape cuttings from California were planted as well as chinese sugar cane. And in 1861 peach stones were planted and the peach trees began to grow.

Robert Dockery Covington's family prospered and built a spacious home, he, Robert D. had cut large stones from a nearby mountain and built a grand home for those day pioneers. The walls were three feet thick and built Colonial style. There were two fireplaces on each of the three floors. The upper floor was used for years as a dance floor for the young people, many people spoke of their generous and good hospitality.
---------------------------------------------------------
Robert Dockery Covington. Written by himself April 1872. St. George, High Priest Record Book 15649 p. ((he wrote a beautiful hand)

"I was born August 20, 1815 in the State of North Carolina, Richmond Co., City of Rockingham. Baptized February 3, 1843 by Benjamin Clapp in the State of Mississippi, Noxebe Co. Ordained a Bishop 1858 by Amasa Lyman and George A. Smith. Received my endowments in Nauvoo in the fall of 1845. Came to Salt Lake in 1847. Spent 1846 at Winter Quarters. I went on a mission to the Southern States in the fall of 1849. Returned in the spring of 1856.

I was sealed to my wife Elizabeth Thomas 1867. Nancy Roberts taking her part. We had four children, John, Emily, Sarah and Robert. I was sealed to my wife Malinda Alison on December 1856 by whom I had one child, Mary Ellen. Was sealed to Nancy Robert Dec 28, 1856 by whom I had four children, Phoebe, Thomas, Malinda and James. My grandfather was John Covington. My grandmother was Nancy Wall. Her forefathers immigrated to America at an early date. My grandfather on mother's side was William Thomas. My Grandmother was Rachel Roe."

Robert Dockery Covington was appointed May 7, 1857 Bishop of Washington Ward, Washington Co., Utah. Set apart August 1, 1857 with Brother Harrison Pierce, 1st Counselor Bro. Jonathan R. Ragean 2nd counselor.

Further info - From Documentary History of the Church:

The Dixie Mission left Salt Lake City April 6, 1857 and came to Parowan without any serious accidents. We remained three or four days to get grinding done. They went to Cedar City where we met President Height. It took six days from Cedar to Washginton. President Height aided us on our trip having to make roads over the roughest ground I ever saw. We arrived May 6, 1857. On May 7, 1857 we were called together to organize a branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saint. We numbered about 160 men, women and children, 200 head of cattle, some sheep and pigs and children.

Men who were called were J. B. Begina, John Spouce, Richard Queen, W.H. Crawford, john Thomas, J.D. McCollough, James Matthos, Gabriel Cooley, William Jergens, William Slade, Dr., William Slade, Jr., Robert Loyd, Joseph Harfield, John Freeman, J.M. Couch, John Hawley, William Hawley, Jacob Clark, Stephen Duggins, William Duggins, Thomas Smith, ?lmstead Richer, Alexander Parron, Robert Covington and Edward West.

Brother Height took charge. Brother Crawford took the minutes, “Oh My Father” was sung. Bro Height offered prayer. It was moved that Brother Height appointed president. He appointed Robert Dockery Covington. It was Bro. Covington’s right to choose his counselors. He said that he preferred for the President to choose his counsellors so Bro Harrison Pierce, 1st Counselor and Johnathan R. Ragean, 2nd Counselor were chosen. Instructions were given on how to honor the Priesthood, how to treat the Indians, and the Brethren were exhorted to put down evil wherever it was found. Prayer was offered by Harrison Pierce. That evening a meeting was held and the charge given over to Brother Covington.

August 22, 1857
George A. Smith and others visited Washington where the Dixie Mission was being established. We arrived Tuesday
August 18, 1857 and was most cordially welcomed by Brother Covington and others who spared no pains to make our visit a pleasant one. Brother Smith thought that no other settlement had a more promising start in the mountains, considering the lateness of the start. The corn planted by the Indians was fifteen feet high. Ours was not quite that high as it was not planted until the 15th of June. The cotton looked well, never had the old cotton grower seen so many balls on a single stock and such thrift.

January 6, 1859
Robert Covington was in President’s office when he with others went with President Young to administer to Fanny Murry, a sister of President Young.

April 14, 1859
Elder Amasa W. Lyman tarried with Brother Covington. He found them busy planting wheat.

October 31, 1859
Brother Covington in Salt Lake Reports the cotton crop good. Sugar came the best he had ever seen.

June 3, 1857
Amasa M. Lyman writes, returning from California, he camped with Robert D. Covington who informed him that he though 1,000 acres of good land could be cultivated. Good herd grounds with plenty of grass also plenty of wood and water.

1860
Robert D. Covington was Notary Public for Washington Co.

April 16, 1860
Was chosen as judge of cotton and tobacco of State Fair.

April 1, 1861
A contract was let for a road to be built near Beaver Dams to Robert D. Covington, James D. McCullough, James Pierce and Walter E. Dodge. Robert has cultivated cotton every year since he was bishop and has preserved specimens and grape cuttings were imported from California. The Chinese sugar cane was planted. Grain was taken from Fifty to Ninety miles to be ground. To get blacksmithing done, they also traveled that far. Many southern men left after the first year declaring cotton could not be grown there. Those who remained are acquiring sheep, cattle and goats.

August 27, 1862
Robert D. was chosen County Representative of the Deseret Agriculture and Manufacturing Society. Within six weeks he was to hold a County Fair, give awards and choose helpers.

September 25, 1862
President Brigham Young returning to Salt Lake related that they were given peaches and grapes to feast on in Washington. Also viewed with pleasure the fine crop of Brother Covington’s who understood his business and puts whole heart into his work.

March 22, 1863
Robert at St. George Conference took his seat with the State High Council

November 2, 1865
Bishop Covington was one of the speakers. He reported Washington Ward in good condition.

May 7, 1865
At conference in St. George, Robert D. was sustained Presiding High Priest over his Ward.

November 6, 1864
A conference was held with Apostle Erastus Snow presiding. A convention of experienced men of Washington and Kane Counties to consider self protection. To establish uniform priced in Exchange for grain, etc. Cotton $1.25 lb, Molasses $4.00 gal, Tobacco 3.00 lb and preserves $6.00. Robert Dockery Covington was one of the men chosen.

September 2, 1867
Robert D. Covington wrote the following letter:
Washington Ward, St. George Stake, September 2, 1867
Elder George Albert Smith
Dear Brother:
Knowing you are interested in the property and general welfare of our Southern Utah Dixie, I thought it would not be amiss to send you a few particulars and items of interest with regards to the settlement. We have had the warmest summer ever experience in this country. It has had its effects of many of us in the shape of languidness. It has been very oppressive. But aside from this, the general health of the people has been very good. While sickness and death nd making such inroads on human families in different parts of the country, we feel like offering our prayers of gratitude to the Almighty for the blessings of health that we enjoy, not with-standing the difficulties we have had this seasons in obtaining sufficient water for irrigation. Our cane and corn look remarkable well. I believe the best that I have seen in the Washington fields. The cotton crop will be late because of the lateness of the season in getting water onto the land. Our fruit crop is profitable. The Indians are quiet and peaceful. (unreadable) taking all into consideration, we are pretty well satisfied with our Dixie home. I remain your brother in the gospel of peace, Robert D. Covington

November 3, 1867
R.D. Covington’s Washington Choir furnished the music.

January 6, 1867
Bishop’s from different settlements started on a missionary tour. R.D. Covington was the number. They visited and held meetings with all the people of the Upper Virgin Valley, then to the Muddy and Beaver Dam settlements. They reached St. Thomas on the 19th having crossed the Virgin River 38 times and the Muddy once. The people of Muddy had raised that year 6,500 bushels of wheat 10,00 bails of cotton. On the 24th of January they returned to St. George. The early part of February Iron Co with Pinto and Pine Valley were also visited. The products of the past five years were astounding. When they saw how much the people had accomplished. The choices products of the earth were there.

February 24, 1867
The Western Union Telegraph Office came to Washington. Robert D. did not place it until he heard from President Young. It was put in Delph Whitehead’s home. Moroni, San Pete Co, was as far south as the line.

Col. D. D. MacArthur: Brother Mendez Cooper and William Prince have just come in from Harrisburg and they report that an Indian had told him that 40 or 50 Navajos were in the vicinity of Grape Vine Springs and had killed three head of cattle and were traveling in the direction of Harrisburg Fields. All are afoot. The friendly Indians are very much excited. The people of Harrisburg are on guard. Indians say they want horses. We wish to know immediately what to do. We await your orders. Yours hastily, Robert D. Covington.

June 19, 1868
Elder George A. Smith wrote in the Millennial Star, “On horseback from Montana to Arizona. At Washington 19th of June. We were kindly received by Bishop Covington. He writes, ‘It was amusing to see my sole companion, Dr. Boyd A. Batchalor from Louisiana pronouncing the quality to the cotton as we went through the mills and looking around at the buxom girls and mechanically nodding a yes, yes to the explanations of the sedate Bishop Covington as he explained the difference of spinning, weaving, twisting, etc.’”
Southern Mission Conference

November 20, 1868
Bishop Robert D. Covington was a speaker. He was still President of High Priest Quorum. He spoke of some of his 25 years experience. Referred to the Lamanites. Ask the people to give them work then pay them food and clothing to encourage them to be industrious.

April 18, 1870
Bishop Covington just home from the Southern States Mission. He started for the east the 18th of last November. Labored in Mississippi and brought two families comprising thirteen persons as part of the fruits of his labors. The Bishops account of conditions is far from good. He says a feeling of unrest, insecurity to life and property to prevalent, greatly increased by suspension of military and civil rule. Instead Klu Klux Klan is numerous and powerful and by no means life is considered safe. Many are moving to Texas and California. He met no opposition from the ministers. A few scattered Saints were left in charge of S. P. Holley – end of copy

Robert Gardner wrote in his diary: We found Robert D. Covington our old neighbor and others who had been sent to that mission some years before. The appearance of these brethren, their wives and children was discouraging. Nearly all had Malaria. They had worked hard and worn out their store clothes and had replaced them with the cotton they had raised on their own lot or farm. The women had corded, spun and woven by hand and colored with weeds this cotton. The men’s shirts, women and children’s dresses and sunbonnets were all made of the same piece of material. Their clothes and faces were all of the same color, being blue with chills. This tried me more than anything I had seen in all my Mormon experience, thinking if I remained my family would soon look the same. I wanted to go back to Salt Lake and spare them this. Brother Covington said, “Let’s pray about it.” We knelt in prayer. It was the Lord’s will we stay. So I said, ” We will trust in God and go ahead.”

Robert D. cut large stones from a nearby mountain and built a grand home for those pioneer days. The walls were three feet thick and built Colonial Style. There were two big fireplaces on each of the three floors. The upper floor was used for years as a dance floor for the young people. Many people speak of the Southern hospitality enjoyed in his home. He had no tolerance for sin. He had the name of doing a good job of housekeeping his Ward living the Gospel. He died at a ripe old age, nearly 87. June 2, 1902, Washington, Utah. (Robert Dockery Covington. Written by himself April 1872. St. George, High Priest Record Book)
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Wikipedia reports – “The Robert D. Covington House was built in 1859 in Washington, Utah. Built for Mormon bishop Robert D. Covington, it was one of the first buildings in Washington and one of the largest in town, furnishing accommodation for visitors that included Brigham Young. The house's second floor originally consisted of one large room, allowing it to be used for assemblies. The second floor has since been subdivided. The Covington family living quarters were on the ground floor and basement.

The house is built of local red sandstone with two stories and a basement. It is an I-house with a rear extension. The house measures 21 feet (6.4 m) by 39 feet (12 m) with two chief rooms on the basement and first floor divided by a massive bearing wall. A front porch has been removed and a back extension added. The Covington House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on April 20, 1978




Susannah COVINGTON. Ref: 4295. Born: 11 Mar 1816 at Olney. Father: Freeman, William, Father Ref: 0. Mother: Tyrell, Elizabth, Mother Ref: 0. Died: 4 Mar 1881 at Ogden, Weber UT aged 64. Mar: 19 Jul 1840 at Bedford to Josiah 668. One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Known as Susan. Christened 27 Oct 1816 at Olney, Bucks, England. Appears in 1861 Census living in West Derby employed as a Bootbinder. Buried at Ogden City Cemetary, Weber, Utah, USA.

On 11 March 1816 Susan Freeman was born in Olney, Buckinghamshire England, daughter of William and Elizabeth Tyrrell Freeman. She was the youngest of five children – three boys and two girls: Richard, born 25 February 1799; Isabella, born 15 August 1802; Samuel, born 4 March 1806; Thomas, born 26 May 1811. They were born in Olney, Buckinghamshire, England at the home fo their parents.

Susan's father, William Freeman, was born in Olney, Buckinghamshire, England ans was christened 27 April 1764. Her mother, Elizabeth Tyrrell, was born in Olney, Buckinghamshire, England as was christened 14 April 1774. Both died in Olney, Buckinghamshire, England and were buried there.

Samuel, Susan's older brother, is our Freeman ancestor. We have to assume that Susan received as much education as they had at that time in Olney. At the proper age she worked as a servant in Bedford, England. She met Josiah Covington in Bedford and they were married 19 July 1841. Josiah was a shoemaker. He was born 10 Jan 1820 in Bedford, England. His father was Berrill Covington, born 6 July 1794 in Wellingbrough, Northamptonshire, England. His mother was Elizabeth Hodges born 29 October 1793 in Bedford, Bedfordshire, England. Records show that Josiah and Susan and his parents were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in July 1841.

Josiah and Susan were parents of six children: Mary Ann born 2 June 1842 at Bedford, England; Josiah Jr. Born 3 June 1845 at Bermondsey, St. James; Berrill born 6 May 1848 at Bedford; Susan Hannah born 10 February 1850 at Windsor Lane, West Darby; Edward Thomas Ord born 15 August 1853 at Liverpool; William Henry born 24 November 1862 at Liverpool. They made their home in Liverpool until they could get enough money ahead to come to the United States and on to Utah.

Some time in 1863 they sent their daughter, Mary Ann, who was twenty-one and their son, Berrill, who was fifteen to the United States. They came to Salt Lake City and then on to Ogden. The following year, Susan and the following children, Edward Thomas Ord, Susan Hannah and William, sailed aboard the General McClellan, leaving Liverpool on 21 May 1864. Her husband, Josiah Sr., and son, Josiah Jr., were left behind. They were to follow as soon as they saved enough for their fare. Things happened, plans changed, they never emigrated, and they continued to live in Liverpool. Josiah married a niece of Susan's and raised a family in England. He was later excommunicated from the Church. The son, Josiah, we have no record of, other than his birth in Bermondsey, Surrey, England (St. James Church records).

On board the McClellan sailing vessel were 802 Latter-day Saints immigrating under the direction of President Thomas E. Jeremy and counselors Joe Bull and George Bywater with John C. Graham as clerk. The counselors were returning missionaries.

During the voyage, which took thirty-three days, the seas were rough with heavy storms, making the voyage very unpleasant. One night a terrific storm arose and did a great deal of damage to the ship. The main mast was broken, so there was grave danger of the vessel sinking. The passengers were warned of this danger and prepared to board the life boats. Members of the Church, including the returning missionaries, gathered together and humbly prayed for their safety and the safety of the ship. The storm passed over with no loss of life.

The next morning the captain called the Saints on deck and told them that if it had not been for their faith and prayers the ship and many lives would have been lost. He acknowledged that a supreme power had guided the ship. During the crossing one child died and was buried at sea; two children were born; and four couples were married.

After the hazardous voyage by ship, they arrived in New York 23 June 1864. President Thomas E. Jeremy relates in a letter to President George Q. Cannon in England, dated 2 July 1864, that upon their arrival in New York they boarded a steamer for Albany, New York. There they boarded a train to St. Joseph, Missouri. Some delays occurred on the railroad on the way to St. Joseph. At Buffalo, New York the railroad officials distributed a quantity of biscuits and cheese. Additional food was provided by the railroad officials at Chicago, Illinois. While in Chicago, President Jeremy met Judge Kinney of Utah and Elders William Goble and Francis A. H. Mitchell. Together hey gave him fifty dollars to assist the immigrants. This money and the generous help of the railroad officials was much appreciated. As a large number of the immigrants were entirely destitute of means, they were dependent upon President Jeremy and his assistants to supply their needs.

On arrival at St. Joseph, Missouri they began getting ready to travel to Utah. Some time before 15 July 1864 Susan and children started traveling with the Joseph Sharp Rawlins company, a Church train of ox drawn wagons. This company consisted of about four hundred immigrating Saints. They left Wyoming, Nebraska 15 July 1864. Most of them had crossed the Atlantic Ocean.

They had the usual pioneer trials. A telegram sent to President Young from Sweet Water bridge, dated 1 September 1864 stated that the wagon train was in fine condition and was doing well. Another telegram sent from Little Sandy 9 September stated that the wagon train was still in good condition and that the cattle were traveling well. The company arrived in Salt Lake City 20 September 1864.

How long Susan and children stayed in Salt Lake City I have not been able to find. Her daughter Mary Ann and son Berrill, were in Ogden or soon moved there after their mother arrived. Mary An met and then married Chauncy Walker West in 1866. She was his eighth wife. He was bishop of the Third Ward in Ogden. He had many and varied interests. Some of his interests were: a lumber mill in Ogden Canyon; a tannery in Ogden making boots, shoes, harnesses and saddles; a blacksmith shop where the Methodist Church stands on 26th and Jefferson; a meat market on the same street; a fine livery stable, a hotel on the corner of Main and 24th Street. These activities provided plenty of places for people to work. Mary Ann's sister, Susan Hannah, also married Chauncy in 1867, being his ninth wife.

Mary Ann had two boys, Milton J. And Orlando. Susan Hannah had just one child, a daughter who died. Berrill married Marie Louise Newman and they had six girls and four boys. I knew some of his children before I found out that they were related to me.

Berrill worked for the railroad. Edward Thomas Ord married Henrietta Tyrrell and had eight girls and five boys. I have m

Chauncey Walker West died 9 January 1870. Mary Ann later met and married Aaron Ross. They had two girls and two boys. The girls were Mae and Sue and the Boys were Aaron and Montella. The son, Aaron Ross, was a doctor in Ogden and I worked with him. Kay and Marilyn Freeman were in the Twenty-eighth Ward with Aaron and his family in the early 1950's. Aaron was in the presidency fo the elders quorum.

Susan Hannah Covington West remarried, but died in childbirth as did the baby.

Susan Freeman Covington died 4 March 1881 at the age of sixty-four from what they called, "softening of the brain." She is buried in the Ogden City Cemetery.

On visiting the cemetery there was no account of her death in the regular files. They finally found her in the unknown file. She was just listed as Mrs. Covington, mother of Mary Ann and Susan Hannah Wells. I gave them the proper information so she is now listed as Susan Freeman Covington and is buried on the Silas Minter lot, but the exact location on the lot is unknown.

(taken from Family History of George Richard and Euphemia Jane Freeman (1990), )

WILLIAM BERRILL COVINGTON. Ref: 2508. Born: 27 Nov 1817 at Bedford. Father: Berrill, Father Ref: 2505. Mother: Hodges, Elizabeth, Mother Ref: 4216. Died: 31 Dec 1905 at Ogden, Weber UT aged 88. Mar: 26 Jul 1838 at Bedford to Heaward, Elizabeth Gill 15574. 2nd Mar: around 1869 at Ogden, Weber UT to Woodmansee, Mary Ellen 15577. One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Known as Berrill. First wife may have been named Griffiths. Emigrated to the U.S. in mid 1840s & endowed inti the Nauvoo Temple 21 Jan 1846.

Set off with Edward Hunter/Jacob Foutz Company for California (1847). 155 individuals and 59 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post on the Elkhorn River about 27 miles west of Winter Quarters, Nebraska on 24 June 1847 arriving in Sacramento.

Article "Saturday, June 19, 1847 on the Oregon Trail:

Elkhorn River, Nebraska: - The Jacob Foutz fifty moved out. They were part of the Edward Hunter Company. The Foutz fifty consisted of 59 wagons and 155 people.

[Included in the second ten led by Alva Keller were: Berrill Covington, Nathaniel Morgan Dodge, Sarah Melissa Dodge, Frederic Heath, Henry Heath, Thomas Heath, Ann Hunter, Ann Eliza Stanley Hunter, Edward Hunter, Mary Ann Hunter, Sarah Ann Hunter, Alva Keller, Nancy Ann Keller, Roxey, Keller, Susanna Mann, Sarah Ann Whitney Potter, Gardner Godrey Potter, William George Potter, Wm. W. Potter, William Starrett, and Henry Tuttle.] "

Embarked on 2nd leg of his trip to Utah with the Amasa M. Lyman Company (1850) commencing 17 Aug 1850. Thirty-four men traveled in this company from Sacramento, California. They crossed the Sierra Mountains to Carson Valley, then followed the north route taken by many coming in search of gold in California, to Salt Lake City, arriving 29 Sep 1850.

Appears in 1880 U.S. Census residing at 2nd Ward, Ogden, Weber UT with wife Mary & children Orson & Anna.

Buried on 4th Jan 1906 in Ogden, Weber UT.

Covington Mountain near Mojave is named after him.

WILLIAM BERRILL COVINGTON. Ref: 2508. Born: 27 Nov 1817 at Bedford. Father: Berrill, Father Ref: 2505. Mother: Hodges, Elizabeth, Mother Ref: 4216. Died: 31 Dec 1905 at Ogden, Weber UT aged 88. Mar: 26 Jul 1838 at Bedford to Heaward, Elizabeth Gill 15574. 2nd Mar: 12 Apr 1852 at Salt Lake City UT to Lemon, Ann Elizabeth 4289. One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Known as Berrill. First wife may have been named Griffiths. Emigrated to the U.S. in mid 1840s & endowed inti the Nauvoo Temple 21 Jan 1846.

Set off with Edward Hunter/Jacob Foutz Company for California (1847). 155 individuals and 59 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post on the Elkhorn River about 27 miles west of Winter Quarters, Nebraska on 24 June 1847 arriving in Sacramento.

Article "Saturday, June 19, 1847 on the Oregon Trail:

Elkhorn River, Nebraska: - The Jacob Foutz fifty moved out. They were part of the Edward Hunter Company. The Foutz fifty consisted of 59 wagons and 155 people.

[Included in the second ten led by Alva Keller were: Berrill Covington, Nathaniel Morgan Dodge, Sarah Melissa Dodge, Frederic Heath, Henry Heath, Thomas Heath, Ann Hunter, Ann Eliza Stanley Hunter, Edward Hunter, Mary Ann Hunter, Sarah Ann Hunter, Alva Keller, Nancy Ann Keller, Roxey, Keller, Susanna Mann, Sarah Ann Whitney Potter, Gardner Godrey Potter, William George Potter, Wm. W. Potter, William Starrett, and Henry Tuttle.] "

Embarked on 2nd leg of his trip to Utah with the Amasa M. Lyman Company (1850) commencing 17 Aug 1850. Thirty-four men traveled in this company from Sacramento, California. They crossed the Sierra Mountains to Carson Valley, then followed the north route taken by many coming in search of gold in California, to Salt Lake City, arriving 29 Sep 1850.

Appears in 1880 U.S. Census residing at 2nd Ward, Ogden, Weber UT with wife Mary & children Orson & Anna.

Buried on 4th Jan 1906 in Ogden, Weber UT.

Covington Mountain near Mojave is named after him.

Elizabeth Ann COVINGTON. Ref: 12065. Born: 27 Apr 1820 at Marlboro Co SC. Father: Thomas, John Pledger, Father Ref: 0. Mother: Sarah, Mother Ref: 0. Died: 7 Dec 1847 at Salt Lake City UT aged 27. Mar: 2 Feb 1839 at Rockingham NC to Robert Dockery 11745. One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Pioneer Indexes, Washington County UT 1852-1870 suggests she was born in Cheshire England.

Accompanied by her husband & family she set off with Edward Hunter/Jacob Foutz Company for California (1847). 155 individuals and 59 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post on the Elkhorn River about 27 miles west of Winter Quarters, Nebraska on 24 June 1847 arriving in Sacramento 1 Oct 1847. Died soon after arriving in Sacramento CA.

EDWARD COVINGTON. Ref: 2592. Born: 28 Aug 1826 at Bedford. Father: Berrill, Father Ref: 2505. Mother: Hodges, Elizabeth, Mother Ref: 4216. Died: 11 Aug 1919 at Salt Lake City UT aged 92. Mar: around 1854 at Bedford to Pickering, Emma 5984. 2nd Mar: around 1890 at Salt Lake City UT to Wallace, Lydia Davis 21006. One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Emigrated to U.S. and joined Mormon faith in Utah.Mormon Pioneers Database states: "Edward sailed in America in 1856, spent some time in New York, and arrived in Salt Lake City by 1859. The first documentation to place him in Utah is an advertisement for his photography business in February 1860, which was prior to the arrival of that season's emigration. Further research is needed to determine the year he came to Utah and the name of the company he traveled with.His wife Emma/Ann/Anna (?) appears with him on the 1856 Columbia ship manifest."

There is a strange record in the 1900 Utah Census giving his details but showing him aged 74, living with a wife named Susan Covington born Mar 1864 (therefore aged 36) & a daughter named Violet White. It shows that Edward had been married for 46 years.

HENRY COVINGTON. Ref: 2513. Born: 4 Apr 1829 at Bedford. Father: Berrill, Father Ref: 2505. Mother: Hodges, Elizabeth, Mother Ref: 4216. Died: 15 May 1863 at Salt Lake City UT aged 34. One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Henry sailed to America in 1852 on the ship Ellen Maria. Travelled to Utah with an Unknown Company in 1856. He initially lived in the 14th Ward in Salt Lake City.

Emma COVINGTON. Ref: 5984. Born: 25 Jul 1831 at Newbold Pacey. Father: Pickering, John, Father Ref: 0. Mother: Hutchings,Hannah, Mother Ref: 0. Died: 28 Aug 1886 at Salt Lake City UT aged 55. Mar: around 1854 at Bedford to Edward 2592. One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

May have been known as Anna.

SARAH ELIZABETH COVINGTON. Ref: 3468. Born: 6 Mar 1835 at Bedford. Father: Berrill, Father Ref: 2505. Mother: Hodges, Elizabeth, Mother Ref: 4216. Died: 8 Jun 1914 at Ogden, Weber UT aged 79. Mar: 5 Aug 1855 at Ogden, Weber UT to West, Chauncey Walker . One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Christened: 28 Jun 1837 at Bedford. Travelled to Utah with family on the Abraham Owen Smoot Compoany (1852). Buried 10 Jun 1914 at Ogden, Weber, Utah, USA.

Had 8 children with Chauncey Walker West, who also married 3 other Covingtons, 2 named Mary Ann (2506) her sister, on same day as he married Sarah Elizabeth & (1819) and one Susan Hannah (1716) along with 5 others. He fathered a total of 35 children between them.

PRISCILLA COVINGTON. Ref: 1740. Born: 17 Jan 1839 at Bedford. Father: Berrill, Father Ref: 2505. Mother: Hodges, Elizabeth, Mother Ref: 4216. Died: 7 May 1916 at American Fork UT aged 77. One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Christened: 31 Mar 1839 at Bedford. Travelled to Utah with family on the Abraham Owen Smoot Compoany (1852). Buried at American Fork Cemetery, Utah, USA

JOHN THOMAS COVINGTON. Ref: 12064. Born: 4 Aug 1840 at West Somerville MS. Father: Robert Dockery, Father Ref: 11745. Mother: Thomas, Elizabeth Ann, Mother Ref: 12065. Died: 13 Jun 1908 at Torrey UT aged 67. Mar: Sep 1862 at Salt Lake City UT to Lundblad, Johanna 6105. 2nd Mar: 15 Mar 1875 at Salt Lake City UT to Adams, Elizabeth Ann 12066. 3rd Mar: 7 Mar 1883 at St George UT to Carling, Lydia May 12968. One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Travelled with parents & the Edward Hunter - Jacob Foutz Company (1847) wagon train from Nebraska to Sacramento CA.

Probably the most profilic Covington in terms of fatherhood. He sired 30 Covingtons with his 3 wives.

When John Thomas Covington was 22, he made a trip north for supplies and as he neared Washington he was met by his father who during the rest of the trip brought him up to date on the town news. Where upon he, John Thomas asked it there were any new girls in town, his father answered there were some new girls, but the prettiest was a little Swedish girl, and his father concluded, "If you don't marry her I trust I will."

It wasn't long after that and after a brief courtship he married the sixteen year old Swedish girl, Johanna Ludblad. They began a happy life together. From Washington the young couple moved to Cash County. They returned to Washington but moved again this time to Beaver to be near Johanna's mother.

John was a good musician after composing his own music for his violin, in night the whistling of a bird kept ringing through his head until he could not sleep. He arose and wrote the notes for his violin. This tune proved so popular he called it the "Ladies Favorite". He and his brother-in-law, Winslow Farr, wrote a song called "The Big Cottonwood Waters." Where ever he lived John and his violin were called into service. It was an unusual sight to see him playing his violin as he danced the square dances, with his partner clinging to his coat tail. Often he walked miles to play for a dance, after the dance was over he walked home. He was full of fun and took great pleasure in teaching his children to play and sing. He had an orchestra in his family. He with family and friend liked to gather around the organ and sing.

While living in Adamsville, John took as his plural wife Elizabeth Adams. She was a daughter of David Barclay Adams and Lydia Catherine Mann. They were married in the Old Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Utah and at the same time his first wife Johanna was sealed to him. To the marriage John Thomas and Elizabeth Adams were born 13 children our heritage is brought through Junius Gilbert Covington their 12th child.

The family wasn't satisfied in Adamsville but was undecided where to go. Elizabeth was anxious to move to Wayne County where her people had gone. But Johanna said she thought it would be better to move where they have more relatives. So it was decided to go to Orderville, they left Beaver April 15, 1877 and they joined the United Order. John and his wives were good workers. He worked in the gardens and fields but most of his time was spent in herding sheep.

The Indians were bad at this time. He exercised great influence over them. He with other were often called on to make peace with the Indians. The united order owned a great deal of the Buckskin Mountains. They had a big dairy there also used it for range for their sheep. The Indians resented this and claimed the land for their own. They were very ugly and the white people were in constant danger from them.

Brother Covington was herding sheep on Buckskin Mt. when the dog, "Queen", as prized imported dog, which the order had traded a cow for, was shot while on duty with the sheep. Reports reached John that "George" an Indian with a mean temper was making threats against him. One day, while out with the sheep he crossed a deep wash, when he reached the opposite bank he came face to face with "George". John was unarmed but putting on a bold front said, "I hear you were going to kill me, now is your chance." George impressed by his bravery would not shoot and later proved to be a friend.

About the time the united order was broken up John married his third wife Lydia May Carling a daughter of Isic Van Wagoner Carling and Mariam Hobson. She was born March 1, 1866. There were seven children born to this union.

When the united order was discontinued Brother Covington, Jonathan Heaton and George W. Adair rented the order sheep. During the summer the sheep were herded in the mountain during the winter they were herded "out in the sand".

When Brother Covington drew out from his partnership, he bought a dairy ranch that had belonged to the order. The ranch was located at the mouth of Dairy and Main Canyon's.

Two of John's families lived on the ranch in the summer milking cows, making cheese and butter. Late in the fall they moved into town for winter. Brother Covington raised wonderful gardens in the ranch. His was a generous nature he would give sacks of vegetables to anyone who called. Often he would start for Orderville with a load of vegetables for his families. But everyone he met he stopped to talk to them, but by the time he arrived home the wagon would be almost empty. His home though humble was always open to everyone.

At the time of the raid on the polygamists he and his son-in-law, Thomas Chamberlin were arrested and sent to the penitentiary for having more than one wife. He served six months in the "pen". With his violin for company. One morning he wasn't feeling very well and didn't get up at the regular time. He was still in bed when the doors were unlocked for breakfast. When he tried to open his door it was locked again. The other prisoners said, "Now you won't get out" John took his violin and played "The Methodists Prayer" he fairly made the violin talk. When the guard came along he found he corridor crowded with prisoners listening to the music. The guard swore and said, "Covington, if you stop that violin I'll let you out." So, he got his breakfast with the rest.

In 1902 John, Elizabeth, Lydia and families moved to Torrey, Wayne County, Utah. There he lived until 1908 when at age of 68 he died after playing the violin most of the night. This violin was passed to his son, who's children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren have fingered and played the heirloom. An heirloom with a legacy that was given us roots, strong roots that have shaped our lives and our children's lives. Without these ancestors' vision and dedication we could not nor would we have done the things that have been meaningful in our lives. What greater wish than to become ancestor of their stature and influence, which would be our best gift to our children.

JOHNNY MAKE THE BOX TALK by Matilda Staker

One summer, in 1885, we were with Father at a dairy on Buckskin Mountain, north of the Grand Canyon in Arizona. The Indians were mad at us, and just waited until my father, who was known to them as “Buckskin Tom” would go away, then they planned to kill all the people at the dairy and burn the house and corrals. This place is now known as Pipe Springs, and the Indians wanted to destroy the buildings that prevented them from getting water at the spring.

Before very long Father and the other men had to take 50 head of cattle to another ranch, and the woman and children were left alone. Just before dark, a band of Indians came and began building big bonfires around the place. The herd boys and five woman and three children who were there went into the house, barred the door and just dropped on their knees and asked God to help them. I can remember looking out the window and seeing the camp fires and the Indians dancing around them. In the house were Phoebe Clark, Lottie Webb, Lue Stolworthy Palmer, Aunt Johannah, Mother, three small boys, Charley Black, 16-years-old and myself. Charley had sneaked out and ran to tell mother’s brother’s Silas and Terry Young, who were about five miles away, to come in. It was quite dark when the boys returned, so they slipped in without being seen.

Just before it got light we saw three men ride up to the Indians. They were my father, Buckskin Tom, and Ed Lamb, and Aunt Johannah’s father, John Covington. They had been warned of the planned attack by a little squaw who had run 30 miles to carry the word to them. They had quickly changed to fresh horses and started back.

The Indians were waiting for daylight to make their attack, and had kept up their whooping and dancing most of the night, while we huddled in the dark house.

Now Buckskin Tom was a friend of the Indians and tried to talk to them. The older Indians listened, but the young ones still wanted to kill us all. When Johnny Covington saw that they would not listen to Buckskin Tom, he walked over and stood by a tree and started to play his violin. Now the Indians had never heard music before. They were so thrilled at the sound of the music made by pushing and pulling a stick across the box that they came closer and closer to Johnny. He stepped backwards, a little at a time, the Indians following him, and when daylight came they found themselves far away from the house and we were safe.

Johnny Covington was always called ‘Johnny-make-the-box-talk’ by the Indians after that.

MARY ANN COVINGTON. Ref: 1819. Born: 2 Jun 1841 at Bedford. Father: Josiah, Father Ref: 668. Mother: Freeman, Susannah, Mother Ref: 4295. Died: 20 Mar 1920 at Ogden, Weber UT aged 78. Mar: 16 Jul 1864 at Salt Lake City UT to West, Chauncey Walker . 2nd Mar: around 1872 at Ogden, Weber UT to Ross, Aaron . One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Appears in 1861 Census living in West Derby employed as a Bootmaker. Emigrated to U.S.A. in 1863 initially to Salt Lake City and then on to Ogden. She was eighth wife of her first husband.

He was bishop of the Third Ward in Ogden. He had many and varied interests. Some of his interests were: a lumber mill in Ogden Canyon; a tannery in Ogden making boots, shoes, harnesses and saddles; a blacksmith shop where the Methodist Church stands on 26th and Jefferson; a meat market on the same street; a fine livery stable, a hotel on the corner of Main and 24th Street. These activities provided plenty of places for people to work. Mary Ann's sister, Susan Hannah, also married Chauncey in 1867, being his ninth wife.

Mary Ann had two boys, Milton J. And Orlando. Susan Hannah had just one child, a daughter who died. Berrill married Marie Louise Newman and they had six girls and four boys. I knew some of his children before I found out that they were related to me.

Berrill worked for the railroad. Edward Thomas Ord married Henrietta Tyrrell and had eight girls and five boys. I have m

Chauncey Walker West died 9 January 1870. Mary Ann later met and married Aaron Ross. They had two girls and two boys. The girls were Mae and Sue and the Boys were Aaron and Montella. The son, Aaron Ross, was a doctor in Ogden and I worked with him. Kay and Marilyn Freeman were in the Twenty-eighth Ward with Aaron and his family in the early 1950's. Aaron was in the presidency fo the elders quorum.

Chauncey Walker West had in total 9 wives who bore him 35 children.

EMILY JANE COVINGTON. Ref: 12994. Born: 1 Jan 1843 at Summerville MS. Father: Robert Dockery, Father Ref: 11745. Mother: Thomas, Elizabeth Ann, Mother Ref: 12065. Died: 4 Mar 1921 at Taylor UT aged 78. Mar: 17 Oct 1858 at Washington Co UT to Farr, Winslow . One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Biographical Sketh by Great Granddaughter Wilma Susan Harris Smith:

Emily Jane Covington, a New Year's child, was born January 1, 1843 in Summerville, Noxubee Country, Mississippi. She was the Great Great Great Granddaughter of William Covington. William Covington and his younger brothers, John and Thomas Covington, came from England to Maryland with Lord Baltimore in 1632. The brothers had received land grants in Maryland and Virginia from the King of England. William and Thomas moved on and settled in North Carolina.

Emily Jane's father, Robert Dockery Covington, was born August 20, 1815 in Rockingham, Richmond country, North Carolina. He attended school in Rockingham where he obtained a college education. Emily Jane's mother, Elizabeth Thomas, was born April 29, 1820 in Marlborough County, South Carolina.

Robert D. Covington and Elizabeth Ann Thomas married in about 1838 or 1839. Soon after their marriage they moved with Robert's father, Thomas B. Covington, to Summerville, Noxubee County, Mississippi.

With the help of slave labor, the Covingtons established a large successful plantation in Summerville. Here three children were born to Robert and Elizabeth Ann. John Thomas, August 7, 1840; Emily Jane, January 1, 1843; and Sarah Ann, February 2, 1845. Sarah Ann died the same year in 1845.

During this time period many of the Thomas family, relatives of Elizabeth Ann Thomas, had also moved to Summerville, Noxubee County, Mississippi. Some of the Covington and Thomas families attended Gospel meetings which were presented by Mormon missionaries. Robert D. Covington and Elizabeth Ann Covington were baptized February 3, 1843. Robert D. Covington's father, brothers and sisters disapproved of their new religion. Robert D. Covington was eventually disinherited.

In 1845, Robert D. and Elizabeth Ann Covington left Mississippi and joined the Saints in Nauvoo, Illinois. After just two years in Nauvoo, the Covington family joined the great Mormon Westward migration. Travelling by wagon train they headed toward the great Salt Lake Valley. They travelled in Edward Hunter's Company under the leadership of Captain Daniel Thomas. Emily Jane was 4 years old. The wagon train endured rain, hail storms, dust storms, lack of good water and wood to burn.

Indians often followed the group and sometimes approached their camp to beg or trade for food. On one occasion the travelers had stopped to repair wagons near a growth of wild currant bushes. Emily Jane and her older brother John were given an empty lard bucket and sent to pick the ripe currants. When their container was about full, several Indians reared up from hiding with a loud war whoop. The frightened children dropped the bucket and ran for camp. When they looked back the Indians had retrieved the currants and were laughing at their big joke. The Indians, on several occasions, stampeded their cattle. However, the Mormon leaders tried to maintain a friendly relationships as no one wanted a hostile confrontation with the Indian followers.

Somewhere near what is now known as Scotts Bluff, Nebraska, Elizabeth Ann gave birth to her last child, Robert Laborious on August 1, 1847. After traversing the last of the cold, slow and rough miles through the mountains, the Hunter Company arrived in Salt Lake Valley on September 27, 1847. Elizabeth was frail and weakened from the hardships of the journey. She fell ill of a severe respiratory infection and died December 7, 1847.

Robert moved his family to the cottonwood settlement located just south of Salt Lake City. He became the school teacher and was called Professor Covington by the community. He accumulated land and livestock and married twice more. His second wife was Melinda Allison Kelly. His third wife was Nancy Roberts. In April of 1857 Robert D. and a number of other men from the Southern States were called by President Brigham Young to travel to Southern Utah to establish a new settlement on the Virgin River. At the age of 14, Emily Jane Covington was one of the 160 men, women and children who were called to move 330 miles to Southern Utah to establish a new Mormon settlement.

The phrase "I was Called to Dixie" became the by-word of the hardy pioneers who journeyed and stayed to establish the communities of Washington and St. George in Southern Utah. Like the true Dixie of the Southern United States, they planted cotton, sugar cane, tobacco and later alfalfa, vineyards and peach trees.

Winslow Farr, Jr., resided with his father and mother, Winslow Farr, Sr. and Olive Hovey Farr on their farm in the cottonwood settlement. Winslow, Jr. describes his journey to Cotton country:

September 27, 1858: I started with a horse team for the Cotton Country the distance of 330 miles.

After describing his 11 day journey, he continued in his diary:

October 8, 1858: I arrived at my place of destination down in cotton country on the 8th of October in good health. My animals stood the trip first rate.

On the 17th of October 1858 at eleven o'clock a.m., I was married to Emily Jane Covington the daughter of Robert D. & Elizabeth Covington Washington City Washington County Utah. I help to make molasses while was there from sugar cane (Diary of Winslow Farr, Jr. 1856-1899, Page 42).

At the time of their marriage Winslow Farr Jr., was 21 and Emily Jane Covington was 15. Ten days later the newlyweds began their journey back to Winslow's parents home in the Cottonwood settlement.

October 27, 1858: I with my wife started for G.S. Lake the distance of 330 miles arrived there on the 10th of November in good health I am living with my father the following season I farmed my fathers place for one third of the crop he helping what he as able and boarded (sic) us till harvest wheat crops did not do very well this year. I raised for my share 105 bushels of wheat 30 bushels of corn 20 bushels of potatoes and I do not know as this will ever be any (good?) to any one but to my mind I do write as these things present. (Diary of Winslow Farr, Jr. 1856-1899, Page 45).

On November 9th of 1859 Winslow and his wife started by team and wagon for Southern Utah to await the birth of their first child.

Washington County February 3, 1860 : "at 2 o'clock p.m. our first child was born Winslow Robert. (Diary of Winslow Farr, Jr. 1856-1899, Page 45).

Winslow Farr, Jr. helped his father-in-law, Robert D. Covington, quarry sandstone and build a stone wall. In addition, Winslow drove cattle to mountain pastures, hauled seed cotton to the gin, helped bail cotton and plant trees. He also worked for others in exchange for cotton and molasses. On April 24, 1860, their wagons loaded with 100 bales of cotton and 42 gallons of molasses, the young couple headed out for the return journey to the Salt Lake Valley.

Winslow's brother, Lorin Farr, the Mayor of Ogden and the Church President for Weber County, recruited and called the young couple to help establish a new Mormon settlement in Northern Utah. By January of 1861 Winslow and Emily Jane moved to a community known as Mendon, Cache Valley, Utah. They lived in Mendon for a season and then sold the small farm and moved on to Paradise, Cache Valley, Utah.

Emily Jane's first home in Paradise was a single room "dugout" in the side of a hill. A fireplace, located at one end held an iron kettle for cooking in addition to providing heat for the one large room. Their children, Emily Olive Farr, LaFayette Thomas Farr and Lorin Freeman Farr were born in this "dugout" home. Winters were severe, often with four to five feet of snow. Emily Jane told her grandchildren of times when young people, would sleigh ride right over the top of their dugout.

During the time when Emily Jane and Winslow lived in Paradise, Winslow Farr, Jr. was selected as Captain in the Minutemen Militia. The Militia, organized into groups of men to work in the fields, and to provide protection from Indians who would often raid the settlement for cattle and horses.

As was the custom, the pioneers often took time out from their work for entertainment. The Mormon families, traveling by wagons or bobsleds, would gather from miles around. They made beds for the younger children and would dance until the wee hours of the morning. Winslow, who had a saying "I am not a musician, I just love to fiddle around" was always called upon to play his violin for these social occasions. After breakfast they harnesse­d their teams and headed their wagons toward home.

In March of 1882, the U.S. Congress passed the Edmunds-Tucker Act which outlawed the practice of polygamy. By 1884, government agents were gathering evidence and issuing warrants for the arrest of many of the Mormon polygamist­s.

In October of 1885, while Winslow was at work at the ZCMI Co-op in Ogden, the underground sent word that the U.S. Marshals were on their way to place him under arrest. He made his escape by being nailed inside a wooden box which was taken away by team and wagon. Winslow was taken to the home of Simon Halverson in the Marriott settlement. Winslow fled with his third wife, Matilda Halverson Farr, and their children to San Juan County in Southern Utah. Later they moved to an area near Cortez, Colorado. After two years of self-imposed exile, Winslow returned to Utah in November of 1887 to give himself up to the Federal authorities.

FROM WINSLOW FARR JR.'S DIARY:

November 1887 : "We arrived in Ogden all safe in November after having quite a pleasant trip. But some cold weather some 500 hundred miles of travel Br J. T. Johnson and family accompanied us on our journey. Found the rest of my family all well at Ogden I did not come out in public but kept quiet as I wanted to arrange my business to stand my trial in court as there was an inditment (sic) against me I then with my attorneys went up to court and gave myself up to the marshalls they then wanted bonds Br Barnard White William H Wright were my Bondsman I was then released to go where I pleased I then went to work for the co-op till my trial came on which was May 1888 I was then sentenced to 6 months imprisonment and $300 fine and cost of Court by Judge Henderson for keeping my Covenants with my wifes (sic) for unlawful cohabitations I had the privlege (sic) to obey the law and be released but I prefered (sic) Prison walls rather then to abandon my wifes (sic) that god had given me or to go back on my children and religion In the evening myself and Br Lorenzo Waldron were taken by a deputy marshal to the Utah Territorial Penetentiary for the term of 6 months" (Diary of Winslow Farr, Jr. 1856-1899, Page 72)".

Winslow stood trial in the First District Court on May 27, 1888, Docket No. 815. Emily Jane and Melvina were subpoenaed to testify. Emily Jane was called as the States first witness. She claimed the privilege of exemption from testifying, as she was the legal wife; therefore, she was excused. Winslow was convicted of unlawful cohabitation and was sentenced to six months in the Utah Territorial Penitentiary with a fine of $300.00.

When Winslow was released from prison, November 24, 1888, the Ogden Third Ward, where he was a bishop, gave him a grand reception and welcome home party.

Winslow with his wives, Melvina and Matilda, and their children left Ogden in August of 1890. They joined other Mormon families on their journey to establish farms in Mexico. The families arrived in September at Colonia Diaz, a Mormon settlement which had been established in 1885. The Farr's and all of the new arrivals spent the winter living in tents.

January 1891: "We all moved up to Colonia Dublan and laid out a new town bought some land of the Mexicans and got ready to farm and put in a small crop."

Colonia Dublan is located about 150 miles south of Deming New Mexico and 170 miles from El Paso, Texas. To make the trip to Dublan, from Deming, and return by team and wagon required at least 8 days of hard tedious travel.

A railroad was not built until 1897 and then it was still 12 miles beyond Dublan. The railroad eventually extended through Dublan and became a great benefit for travel and marketing the colony's farm products.

Winslow returned to Ogden in the fall of 1892 with his wife Matilda and her children. Melvina with her children remained in Colonia Dublan. Upon arriving in Ogden Winslow rented a home for his wife Matilda and enrolled their children in school. Dividing his time between Emily Jane's farm in West Weber and Matilda's home in Ogden, Winslow spent the following spring and summer in Utah. Emily Jane was a charter member of the West Weber Relief Society which was created February 17, 1893. By 1895, the relief society had raised the funds and built a granary for the storage of wheat for the Bishop's storehouse. The grain was used as seed crops for the farmers in time of crop failure and was also used for donations to the needy in times of disaster.

On October 28, 1893 Winslow with his wife Matilda and their children, joined four other families in seven wagons, with 500 head of "loose stock", and headed for the long journey to Dublan Mexico. Subsequent return trips to Odgen, to visit his family in West Weber, were easier and affordable, when his brother Lorin Farr provided a railroad pass.

January 1, 1897 : "My wife Emily's birthday is today. She is fifty-four years old."

In April of 1897 Sariah Farr, wife of Emily and Winslow's son, Lorin Farr, became suddenly ill. The doctors diagnosed her condition as "brain fever".

April 12, 1897: "Raked all the brush from under the trees administered to my son's wife Sariah who is very sick and stayed a short time by her bedside".

April 13,14,15,16 "waited on the sick did not have my clothes of(f) for 3 days and nights. My son Lorin sent for Doctor Rich He pronounced it brain fever".

April 19, 1897 : "My daughter-in-law is about the same, not much change. We all gathered around the bedside and prayed for her. She seemed a little better."

April 20, 1897 : "Quite stormy and windy. My daughter-in-law not so well, delirious and out of her mind. Sent for Dr. Rich and he brought another man with him to consult. I sat up with her tonight."

April 21, 1897 : "Sariah no better. Fever not quite so high. I sat up with her. The day is stormy and cold."

April 22, 1897 : "My son's wife Sariah died at 5:00 a.m. with brain fever after an illness of two weeks. She leaves a husband and four small children. She was born June 1, 1870 in West Weber, Utah. We went over to Ogden and got a coffin and material to dress her. We returned at 2:00 p.m." (Diary Winslow Farr, Jr. 1897, Page 187).

When Sariah Farr died on April 22, 1897 at the age of 27, she left four small children, Charles Buck, age 8, Emily Evelyn, age 7, Lorin Winslow, age 3 and Nephi Horace, age 2.

Emily Jane's own children were now adults. Starting over with a new family, Emily Jane took her four grandchildren into her home. These grandchildren lived with Emily Jane and their father Lorin until they were grown.

Emily Evelyn Farr Mower, age 90 in 1980, was asked in an interview to describe her grandmother, Emily Jane. She stated, "Oh she was gentle, kind, a wonderful mother. She would sometimes scold us, but she never ever laid a hand on us. She would say to people, I never whip any of these children. I'd hate to meet their mother, up there, and have her say, you spanked my children, you didn't take good care of my children."

In 1897 Winslow was called by the First Presidency of the Church to move permanently to Mexico.

December 20, 1897 : "received a letter from the first Presidency for me to Locate permanently in Mexico quite a Disappointment to some of the family but the Lords will be done" (Diary of Winslow Farr, Jr. 1897, Page 206)".

Before he left for Mexico he deeded his interest in the homestead to Emily Jane. In 1899, Emily Jane divided the farm into parcels and deeded the property to her four sons, Lafayette, Lorin, Barnard and Aldebert.

On January 10, 1899 Winslow married his fourth wife, Sarah Mitchell Graham in Colonia Dublan, Mexico. In December of 1902, Winslow, his wife Melvina and their two youngest sons, Wilford and Ashael, traveled by train to visit the families in Ogden arriving on December 6, and spent the night with his daughter Emily Halverson and family.

December 7, 1902 "Visited my Tilly and children Had dinner with them visited my brother Aaron and Lorins families staid all night at Emilys."

December 8, 1902 "Got a horse and buggy and took my wife Melvina and two little boys over to West Weber to the rest of the family found all well and glad to see us wrote some letters to my folks in Mexico in the eve My children Laffy and family came and had supper with us and spent the evening with us We had a very enjoyable time."

Melvina and her sons stayed often with Emily Jane and her family in West Weber during the time she was in Utah. Emily Jane lived on the farm in West Weber, Matilda lived in her home in Ogden and Sarah lived in her home in Salt Lake City as well as Dublan, Mexico.

Sarah, known as Dr. Sarah Farr, was often called upon as a lay midwife. Sarah gave lectures about the human anatomy and using her own formula, bottled and sold a product known as Dr. Farr's Canker medicine. Evelyn Farr Mower (Granddaughter of Emily Jane) reminisced in a 1980 interview, "Grandfather gave grandma Emily some of aunt Sarah's medicine and it was really gooooood tooo!"

In the spring of 1903 Winslow Jr. records in his diaries, time spent with each of his four wives. Winlsow spent more time with Sarah in Salt Lake City. After returning to Ogden, from an extended stay with Sarah, he records in his diary:

March 20, 1903 "Took horse and buggy and took my wife Melvina and two little boys to Ogden had dinner with my daughter Emily took my wife and boys up to Hyrum and Gooddall Her cousin on her way to Ogden valley to visit her sister Marintha called and see my wife Tilly and talked with her She said that she desired not live with me as wife but did not get a d(i)vorce I tried to reason with her but it was no use Bp (bishop) counselor P Anderson talked with her but all to no purpose She had made up her mind to separate (sic) It seems hard to pull away after rasing (sic) a family together of six children it was against my wishes (to) separate she said I could come and see the children whenever I wanted so we quit on speaking terms I then returned to West Weber."

On April 9, 1903 Winslow attended a Farr family reunion at the Ogden 3rd Ward.

April 9, 1903 "Took train for Ogden met my son Barney and came over to west Weber to my home and got ready with my folks and went over to Ogden and attended the Farr reunion that was held in 3rd ward meeting house and asemby (sic) hall. Arrived about 6 to late for the opening program just in time for supper table were spread and supper was ready a large company sat down to supper I was called on to ask a blessing on the food after supper went over to the hall where there was songs and music and speaches (sic) I played 3 tunes on the violin made a short speech (sic) there was present 260 of the farr descendant and 15 of my own family were present we had a very enjoyable time long to be rememberd (sic) dismissed about 12 pm and I returned to west Weber with my family".

On April 24, 1903 Winslow, Emily Jane, Barnard and Susan Farr, traveled by horse and buggy to Ogden to say goodbye to Melvina as she and her two youngest sons boarded the train for the return trip to Mexico.

In November of 1903 Melvina was hospitalized in El Paso, Texas for an attack of appendici­tis. An operation came too late and she passed away on November 6, 1903. She was buried in Colonia Dublan, Mexico.

November 7, 1903 : "Came to Ogden & heard the sad death of my wife Melvina she was at the Hospital at El Paso Texas where she underwent an operation for apendisitis (sic) & died with blood poison she leaves a loving husband and 11 children to mourn her loss she was a noble woman she was burried (sic) in Dublan Mexico Myself and son Joseph and wife and two little children took train for Mexico the folks at the farm came to see us off all feeling very sad."

His wife Sarah, accompanied by Winslow's brother Lorin, joined them in Dublan in December 1903. Winslow remained in Mexico until July of 1906. In June, a family gathering, including 11 of Melvina's children and 18 of their grandchildren, held a farewell supper for him in the old family home before his final return trip to Utah, Saturday June 30, 1906.

July 2, 1906 : "Never sleep on the train. Sleeping berth is too short. Came from Sacramento to Ogden. Landed at West Weber at 9:00 p.m. in the evening. Walked up to the home and was very tired. Found all well" (Diary of Winslow Farr, Jr. 1906, Page not numbered".

With the exception of occasional brief visits to the West Weber farm, Winslow lived most of the time between 1906 and 1913 with his fourth wife, Sarah, in Salt Lake City. Winslow, Sarah and his brother Lorin spent many hours working in the Salt Lake Temple.

December 25, 1907 Wednesday : "Christmas. Eat dinner at my wife Sarah my wife Emily was with us had a roasted duck received a Christmas gift and some letters from my children in Mexico."

December 26, 1907 Thursday : "My wife Emily went home to West Weber Sarah went to the train roads very muddy" (Diary of Winslow Farr, Jr. 1907, Page not numbered).

July 21, 1908 : "My wife Emily and I went over to Ogden and joined the Old folks excursion to Lagoon had a nice time a splendid dinner and supper I drew a suit of clothes as father of 31 children." (Diary of Winslow Farr, Jr. 1908, Page not numbered).

On February 2, 1913, Winslow suffered a stroke. Winslow and Emily Jane's four sons were called to move him from Salt Lake City to Emily Jane's home in West Weber (now known as Taylor, Utah). Their sons took turns attending and staying up through the night with their father. Winslow died February 18, 1913. He was buried in the Ogden cemetery in Weber County, Utah. After his death Emily Jane and her son Lorin, a widower, continued to live in the old family home. Her son Aldebert, whom everyone called Uncle Dell, moved to Idaho. Her daughter, Olive Emily Farr, had married Samuel Halverson and they made their home in Ogden, Utah. Barnard and Susan Alvord Farr built a home north of the old adobe home on the portion of the homestead which Emily Jane had deeded to "Barney" in 1899. Her son Lafayette and his wife, Nancy Hipwell Farr, built their home on the west section of the old homestead.

Jason Farr, great great grandson of Emily Jane and Winslow, currently farms his great grandfathers' (Lafayette Farr) portion of the original homestead. Emily Jane died March 4, 1921 at the home of Barnard and Susan Farr. She was buried beside Winslow in the Ogden City cemetery, Weber County, Utah.

Emily Jane gave birth to 14 children, including one set of twins. Only five of the children survived to adulthood. All of the infant children are buried with their parents, Winslow and Emily Jane, in the Ogden City cemetery. The only graves, in the Winlsow Farr family plot, which are identified with tombstones are Winslow, Emily Jane, their oldest infant son Winslow Robert and Matilda (third wife).

Emily Jane's grandchildren remember her as a vivid, colorful story teller. She would gather the children around her as she sat in her rocking chair, telling them interesting stories of her early days in Dixie (Southern Utah). Tales of struggles she and Winslow had in trying to cultivate a dry farm in Cache Valley, including the early days of marriage when they went on sleigh rides to church socials and dances, stories of Winslow playing his violin for many occasions, wild bear and Indian stories were but a few of the exciting tales the children loved to hear. She often told accounts of the Shoshone Indians who raided their settlement in Cache Valley for cattle and horses.

She also told stories of the Ute Indians who camped near her home in Ogden. Every summer while on their way to their traditional fishing grounds, near Tremonton, Utah, a band of Utes would stop to camp near her homestead in West Weber. She would give them produce, from her garden, and fruit from her orchard. Water and pasture were always available for their animals.

Dee Farr, a great grandson, has the pistol which belonged to Emily Jane. The gun is a 38 caliber Smith & Wesson five shot, with a rotary barrel. The revolver is engraved with the date February 2, 1886. Emily Jane is purported to have always slept with her 38 under her pillow. Her Grandsons, Ken and Glen Farr, describe Emily as a "crack shot", who could shoot a squirrel out of a tree at 20 paces. All of her grandchildren recall how she loved to read. She would sit by the window, in her rocking chair, with a large stack of magazines and newspapers by her side. The grandchildren recall Emily Jane always wore a clean white apron with two large pockets. They knew, hidden deep in one of those pockets, was her small box of snuff. They remember her delicious homemade bread, her colorful Indian stories, her soft chuckling laughter and her stoic quiet dignity.

Emily Jane was a faithful pioneer woman. Her quiet nature, courage, endurance and dedication to family will always be remembered as endearing qualities by her descendants.

Wilma Smith

EMILY JANE COVINGTON FARR - REFLECTIONS OF HER GRANDCHILDREN

Mabel Farr Harris Decker

Grandma always had the midday meal promptly at 12:00 noon every day. She always rang a lunch bell and expected everyone to be washed and ready to sit down to eat. This ritual was probably a carry over tradition from her father's southern plantation schedule.

When I was a young girl, mama gave me an empty lard bucket and sent me to Uncle Laf's (Lafayette) and Aunt Nanc's (Nancy) home to borrow some wheat. Their home was just a little ways west and a little south of grandma's house which was just south of our house. Returning home with the wheat, by way of Grandma's yard, I heard a buggy coming down the road. In order to get a view of who was coming I turned and started walking backwards. The well outlet pipe caught me in the knee and the wheat went flying in all directions. I tumbled backward into the wash tub which grandma had placed under the water outlet. I don't know who was more surprised, me or the ducks who had been swimming in the small pond next to the metal tub. My backside was thoroughly drenched and as I scrambled to regain my feet, my shoes and stockings slowly filled with water. With wings flapping and quacking with excitement, the ducks quickly devoured their unexpected gourmet feast. Embarrassed and soggy, I hurried home to explain what had happened. Papa laughed heartily at my predicament. Mama was not amused and gave me a stern lecture about being so careless.

My cousin Evelyn and her husband, Jeff Mower, lived across the street from grandma's and just down and across the way from our house. My sister Lavon and I loved to hold and play with their infant daughter Ruth. Ruth was a happy baby who laughed often at our play antics. I was fourteen when Ruth took sick and died unexpectedly. As the family gathered at the Mower home, everyone, including myself, seemed to be crying. I noticed grandma seated in a chair, dry eyed and gazing out of a window. I approached grandma and asked, "Aren't you sad that little Ruth died?" She replied, "Of course I am dear". I asked grandma, "why aren't you crying like everyone else?" She looked up at me and sighed, "Oh my dear, I cried all of my tears years ago".

When Grandpa Winslow had his stroke he was living with Aunt Sarah in Salt Lake City. Papa and his brothers moved him back to grandma's home in Taylor. With the assistance of some brethren from the ward they all took turns in sitting through the night to care for grandpa. Grandma slept at our home. The first week he was in a coma. The last week he would partially wake for a few minutes at a time. As was the routine, mama and grandma went by early in the morning to see how grandpa was doing. One morning as grandma walked in the door grandpa cried out, "Well hello Melvina, when did you get here?" Grandma looked startled for a moment, but then replied, "Oh, just a little while ago". She sat beside grandpa and never explained that she was really Emily Jane. In later years when we visited grandma's home, she and Uncle Lorin would be sitting in their chairs, each by a different window and reading from a stack of old newspapers or magazines. A year before grandma died, I acquired a brand new Kodak camera, and she posed for me standing outside her home in Taylor. I believe the year was about 1920. I am built just like grandma. We look just like a plump sack of potatoes tied in the middle.

Kenneth Alvord Farr

When I was about three or four, Lavon and Mabel enjoyed dressing me up in little girls clothes to pretend that I was their big baby doll. I did enjoy the attention, until the day they decided to dress me up and walk me over to grandma's house. They put a frilly white dress on me and twisted my curls into ringlets and put a big bow in my hair. I can still hear the sound of grandma's chuckling laughter as we walked into her front door. Embarrassed I started to bawl my head off. Grandma picked me up and sat me on her knees. I quieted right down as she preceded to tell me a story about a big bear.

Some years later I noticed grandma's habit of reaching into her apron pocket, sniffing and wiping her nose. I asked mama, "Why does grandma always do that?" Mama replied, "Grandma has a little tin box in her apron pocket and every now and then she dips a little snuff".

Papa enjoyed presenting and directing, and often playing a lead roll in community or church
plays. Papa had a collection of items which he often used as stage props. The most intriguing was a pistol which he informed me had belonged to grandma. I can still recall the murmur of excitement in the audience when blanks fired on the stage echoed through the meeting hall.

"Grandma", papa said, "slept every night with the gun under her pillow. She suggested the weapon was for protection from Renegade Indians and from Federal Marshals who might try to sneak into the house in the middle of the night. Papa insisted grandma was a crack shot, who could shoot a squirrel out of a tree from twenty paces. The firing pin was missing when I gave the gun to my youngest son, Dee Farr. Dee had the gun completely restored. I gave Winslow and Emily Jane's family bible to my son Keith Farr.

Evelyn Farr Mower

Every other day grandma always carried the same large round pan to the cellar to get just the right amount of flour to bake six loaves of bread. On her baking days we always enjoyed the treat of warm bread with plum jam. One of my chores was to feed the chickens, ducks, geese and to gather the eggs. When I entered the barn yard I had to watch out for the old gander who was mean and territorial. Many times, with neck extended and wings flapping, he chased me as I scurried up the haystack to escape his stinging bite. Sometimes the old goose would circle and keep me a prisoner atop my perch. Eventually, content with himself, he would wander away while I made my escape down the other side.

One of my other daily chores was walking to the lower pasture to bring the cows home for milking. I remember wearing four buckle galoshes, in the spring and fall, as the pasture was always very wet and swampy. If it was storming, grandma often sent one of the boys to bring the cows home. We all took turns bringing in kindling and firewood for the stove to heat the house. I never had to milk the cows, thank goodness, as this was always considered the boys' chore. We kept some milk for our daily use, and we skimmed cream for weekly butter churning. Our extra milk was sold to the dairy. This provided us with a small cash return.

I went to school only four days a week. I stayed home every Monday to help grandma do the washing and ironing. We heated the water, for wash day on a coal stove which stood in a shed behind the house. The clothes were scrubbed and rinsed by hand on washboards which stood in large galvanized tubs. The clothes were hung on outside lines to dry. Flat irons, heated on the kitchen stove, were used to iron the clothes. It took both of us most the day to finish this chore.

Grandma taught me the basics of sewing on her old foot treadle sewing machine. We cut our patterns out of old newspapers. We cut open and bleached our flour sacs, which we used to make dish towels, tablecloths, napkins, nightgowns, and underwear. When we could afford it we bought cloth to make our dresses, skirts and blouses. One of my favorite pastimes was making doll clothes from scraps of material. By the time I was fourteen I was making all of my own clothes.

When we were teenagers the church started mutual meetings for the youth. Whenever the weather permitted, grandma always encouraged us to attend those meetings, which were held on Sunday evenings.

When I was a young girl grandpa and Aunt Melvina, who lived with her family in Mexico, came on the train with her two youngest sons to visit grandma and her family. My brothers slept in the upstairs north bedroom, which was the larger room. I had the south upstairs bedroom to myself. Aunt Melvina slept in my bed and I slept on a pallet bed on the floor. Grandpa stayed downstairs with grandma in the big front room.

In the summer and fall we kept very busy canning and drying fruits and vegetables. I would often climb onto of the buggy shed roof to spread sheets out where we dried corn, apples, and apricots. I still remember the taste of one of my favorite desserts, which was a dish of white currants with a little cream poured over the top.

My oldest brother Charles raised pigeons and we all looked forward to the days when grandma made a big pan of pigeon pie. She used the pigeon breast, vegetables, and a biscuit dough on top, and Oh, it was so good.

When Uncle Barney and Aunt Susie were married, they lived in grandma's big front room while their home was being built next door. Grandma shared the upstairs bedroom with me. Barney worked at the sugar factory to earn money to build his home on the twenty acres, which grandma had deeded to him. The house was substantial and well built. The home is in good condition and it is still occupied today.

When grandma took sick, Barney and Susie took her into their home and cared for her until she died in 1921. When Ken (Barney and Susie's youngest son) and LaRene were married they moved into Uncle Barney and Susie's old home. The year they married Ken was driving past our place with a team and wagon. I spotted grandma's old rocking chair and side table atop the load. Jess hailed Ken who explained that LaRene had cleaned a lot of old junk out of the house and he was on his way to the dump. With Ken's permission, Jess rescued grandma's chair and small folding table. Jess sanded and painted this furniture which we placed in our living room. After Jess died, I gave grandma's furniture to my daughter, Fern (Kaye). My father Lorin lived in grandma's old home until his death in 1946. Jess and I sold the property to Johnny Favero. As you can see, Johnny built a lovely house in the exact place were grandma's home once stood.

Glen Farr

Grandma gathered my brothers, sisters and cousins around her rocking chair, and as we sat on the floor she told us Indian and bear stories. She told us tales of the day she lived as a young woman in Southern Utah and of the time she and Winslow worked hard to establish a dry farm in Cache Valley, Utah. She was a good story teller. She told us of the years they lived in their home in Ogden. Each summer a band of Indians would set up their tents in the Farr family backyard. They came to trade their hand made goods for sugar, salt, and other staples. The children became especially fond of an Indian woman they all called Aunt Mary. On one occasion grandma allowed Aunt Mary to carry my infant father, Lafayette Farr, on her back when the Indian clan traveled on a one day trip to the Ogden hot springs.

When Grandma divided her farm in 1899 she deeded twenty acres of her homestead to my father Lafayette. She deeded twenty acres to each of her four living sons. When Uncle Dell "Aldebert" moved to Idaho, Inez and I bought his twenty acres. I have a chair that grandpa Winslow purportedly made while incarcerated in the Utah State Penitentiary for polygamy George Q. Cannon appears to be sitting in the chair shown in a photo of the prisoners in the penitentiary. My father gave me a cane which belonged to grandpa. The style colors and design of this particular cane lead me to believe it is was of Mexican origin and not one of the ten canes he made while he was in the Penitentiary.

Dee Farr, a great grandson, furnished a photograph of Emily Jane's gun. It is a 38 Smith & Wesson 5 shot revolver with a rotary barrel. The revolver is engraved with the date February 2, 1886.

Jason Farr, great great grandson of Emily Jane and Winslow Jr., currently farms his great grandfather's (Lafayette Farr) portion of the original homestead.

Emily Jane is buried at Ogden City Cemetery, Weber UT.

ROBERT LABORIUS COVINGTON. Ref: 6112. Born: 1 Aug 1847 at Scotts Bluff NE. Father: Robert Dockery, Father Ref: 11745. Mother: Thomas, Elizabeth Ann, Mother Ref: 12065. Died: 27 Dec 1928 at Washington UT aged 81. Mar: 14 Jan 1892 at Washington UT to Iversen, Rasmenia Willemi 6113. One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Born en route Edward Hunter - Jacob Foutz Company (1847) wagon train from Nebraska to Sacramento CA.

BERRILL COVINGTON. Ref: 1669. Born: 6 May 1848 at St Botolph,Aldergate. Father: Josiah, Father Ref: 668. Mother: Freeman, Susannah, Mother Ref: 4295. Died: 7 Jan 1928 at Ogden, Weber UT aged 79. Mar: 5 Oct 1874 at Salt Lake City UT to Newman, Maria Louisa 5982. 2nd Mar: 1 Oct 1926 at Ogden, Weber UT to Allen, Alice 6079. One of the original Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travellers (1847-1868).

Christened: c 1864 at Bedford. Emigrated to U.S.A. in 1863 initially to Salt Lake City and then on to Ogden. In 1880 US Census shown as living in 4th Ward, Ogden, Weber UT employed as a Baggageman on Railway